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Looking for MWD in the Patch - Click HERE for Original Thread

broken_legs
Hey Guys n Gals,


I'm trying to get into the oil field doing MWD or wireline.


Can any of you share your experience doing the same? Maybe recommend a good place to start. I am green with no oil field experience.

Thanks for any help.
awd
Do you have an education?
broken_legs
Yeah I have a Bachelor of Technology in Electronics Engineering Technology


I have two friends who just got hired through Sclum, I also met the Head of HR for Canada, Kevin Kennet at the Go Expo two weeks ago. I sent in my resume but havent heard anything backyet....


Can you give me an idea of what the money is like in Wireline IE where you started, where youll be at 6 months/ a year take home pay etc... I ahve heard lots of varying stories and cant nail anyone down to something concrete

thanks
awd
Originally posted by broken_legs
Yeah I have a Bachelor of Technology in Electronics Engineering Technology


I have two friends who just got hired through Sclum, I also met the Head of HR for Canada, Kevin Kennet at the Go Expo two weeks ago. I sent in my resume but havent heard anything backyet....


Can you give me an idea of what the money is like in Wireline IE where you started, where youll be at 6 months/ a year take home pay etc... I ahve heard lots of varying stories and cant nail anyone down to something concrete

thanks



PM me any questions you have.

broken_legs
I know about Schlumberger, Baker Hughes, and Ryan energy


Are there any other companies hiring for MWD right now?

Thanks
awd
Originally posted by broken_legs
I know about Schlumberger, Baker Hughes, and Ryan energy


Are there any other companies hiring for MWD right now?

Thanks



Halliburton, Sperry Sun....

You are a little late on hiring though.

broken_legs
Originally posted by awd


Halliburton, Sperry Sun....

You are a little late on hiring though.



Thats what you think....

I have an interview with slb next week

Thanks for all the help
:clap:

kaput
How about Tucker? I've seen people all over downtown for some conference they're holding.
Lexxan
Haha 14 and 7.. awd you do realize that mwd consultants work like 180 days a year? I've worked 25 days on and 25 off so far this spring and you make way more money. Not to mention the fact that wirelining is menial logging, perforating plug setting etc. work that will get you absolutely nowhere experience wise in the office. Unless you just want to be a wireline co-ordinator out of the office which is also a fairly dead end job. At least MWDing you can sit out on the the rig and learn a shitload about drilling so you can fly into sales or drilling divisions of companies.

Also wirelining you might be doing multiple jobs perday and working like 16 hour days with lots of driving time. It sucks ass I've done it before for precision wireline. I work half the year and sit in a shack on my ass doing about 20 minutes of work a day gaining valuable experience for my career in the office making 2x the money if not more.
Lexxan
As for companies
Baker Hughes, Schlumberger Anadrill, Weatherford Dalen, Compass Directional, Newsco, Continental, Ryan Energy, Omni Drilling, Blackmax, Phoenix Technology, Directional Plus
Lexxan
haha ya i don't care... but you didn't read my post. Agreed that yes you can move up in your schlumberger office but you still have no good oilfield experience. Wirelining is bottom of the totem pole field work that is invaluable. What are you gonna do.. stay with schlumberger forever in the wireline division? What have you learned? How to read logs and look at collars to navigate into place for the plug/gun etc? wow.... The only thing I can think that is beneficial is maybe setting a whipstock for a reentry well.

Sure lots of guys go DDing after MWDing but that's not my case and even if I did they get paid $900-$1100 a day. I'm learning about drilling operations which is way more beneficial to ones career than cased hole well servicing.

Sorry not trying to be an asshole just trying to help broken_legs.

So in summary.. you want quick cash and don't care about anything else go wirelining because the money kind of sucks ass training for mwd.
broken_legs
I like to hear that doing MWD you can work 25 and 25 or 180 days a year.

Like awd said , and i've talked to about 10 people who were doing MWD in the last week or two, they work like 300 out of 365 days. I've heard horror stories of being on a rig for 117 days straight!


So its nice to hear there is a chance to move around int he company. I have a pretty sweet office job right now ina marketing office, but I have to pay off some bills so its time for the oil patch. My ultimate goal is to work on the rigs for a bit but then end up managing or into an office again in a few years.


Lexxan - Who are you working for right now Precision?

Thanks
Lexxan
No.. I consult for phoenix technology services. I suppose if you're staff you might be working more. But.. even if you do work 300 days a year who cares.. Get trained first and learn everything you can about drilling for the next 3 years. Then you're set for the office. The cash is great.. the experience is worth 10x that though.
kaput
I've heard lots of bad things about working for Schlumberger. Not from their field guys necessarily, but two of their software people left for my company and don't seem to think much of the slum. A guy I go to school with works in the field for them during the summer too and he also doesnt like them.
Lexxan
LOL god that would suck... 4 days off a month. Okay I'll suggest applying for any smaller companies.
broken_legs
Well if anyone cares i got the job

easiest interview ever!
Neons4life
what's the pay like?

and what about your hours?
awd
I have an interview with Ryan Energy tomorrow for DnM-- any insight?
broken_legs
Originally posted by Neons4life
what's the pay like?

and what about your hours?



The pay is more than you can spend

The hours are 24 hours/day 35 days a year.

broken_legs
Originally posted by awd
I have an interview with Ryan Energy tomorrow for DnM-- any insight?



Well I know they are hiring a lot of DeVry Students. They are actually putting on a 4 month training course for MWD at DeVry.


Other than that if you go to the website theres still a posting there for MWD and it gives you some guys email address.

two guys from Ryan came to DeVry when I was still going there and did a little presentation.

Ryan is part of nabor.

thats all the insight i got:dunno:

HuMz
Originally posted by kaput
I've heard lots of bad things about working for Schlumberger. Not from their field guys necessarily, but two of their software people left for my company and don't seem to think much of the slum. A guy I go to school with works in the field for them during the summer too and he also doesnt like them.



my cousin's been with them for about 6 months on the fracking crew and loves it, everyone ive talked to said its an amazing company to get on with, hes making about 40,000 a year for the first year plus he gets his daily living allowence 2 weeks on 2 weeks off, shlumberger also will pay to send him to school after his year is up into something that they think he'd be good at, they also have one of the lowest employee turn over rates, i forget the numbers but its like 98% of employee's they retain after there first year

broken_legs
Originally posted by HuMz


my cousin's been with them for about 6 months on the fracking crew and loves it, everyone ive talked to said its an amazing company to get on with, hes making about 40,000 a year for the first year plus he gets his daily living allowence 2 weeks on 2 weeks off, shlumberger also will pay to send him to school after his year is up into something that they think he'd be good at, they also have one of the lowest employee turn over rates, i forget the numbers but its like 98% of employee's they retain after there first year




40,000/yr - Thats IT!???

I think thats the wage they pay the MWD guys when your in training for the first 3-4 months but after that when you start running yuor own jobs it jumps up to 70-80k/yr

i could get a job in a call center working 9-5 and make more than 40,000/yr

thats messed

funkytuqe
Wow, some god info in this thread.
I have my Electronics Enginnering Tecnology. I have been working for Nortel for the past 6 years and i want OUT!! What would you guys recomend??
awd
Originally posted by funkytuqe
What would you guys recomend??




Try applying?

Lexxan
I would highly recommend phoenix technology.. we're busy as shit and our directional tool is nice and easy.
funkytuqe
Originally posted by awd



Try applying?



HAHA, i suppose that would be the obvious solution.

Hey lexxan, is Phoenix in Calgary? i went there site but it said "Phoenix Technology Group currently have no vacancies" but thanks for the sugestion, i wil try to remember and check back at the website.

I would rather work in town than out on the rigs, do any of these energy companys have jobs in Calgary or is it all up north??

awd
Originally posted by funkytuqe

I would rather work in town than out on the rigs, do any of these energy companys have jobs in Calgary or is it all up north??



No field jobs will have you working in town -- you will either be on a rotation (ie. 15/5, 14/7, etc) or as an MWD, on location for the entire drilling process.

That said, I know Ryan Energy and SLB are both looking for MWD hands.

funkytuqe
Excuse my ignorance but what is MWD??
awd
Originally posted by funkytuqe
Excuse my ignorance but what is MWD??



measurements-while-drilling

The evaluation of physical properties, usually including pressure, temperature and wellbore trajectory in three-dimensional space, while extending a wellbore. MWD is now standard practice in offshore directional wells, where the tool cost is offset by rig time and wellbore stability considerations if other tools are used. The measurements are made downhole, stored in solid-state memory for some time and later transmitted to the surface. Data transmission methods vary from company to company, but usually involve digitally encoding data and transmitting to the surface as pressure pulses in the mud system. These pressures may be positive, negative or continuous sine waves. Some MWD tools have the ability to store the measurements for later retrieval with wireline or when the tool is tripped out of the hole if the data transmission link fails. MWD tools that measure formation parameters (resistivity, porosity, sonic velocity, gamma ray) are referred to as logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools. LWD tools use similar data storage and transmission systems, with some having more solid-state memory to provide higher resolution logs after the tool is tripped out than is possible with the relatively low bandwidth, mud-pulse data transmission system.

funkytuqe
Haha, wow thats a more than adequite explanation.
thanks for your help awd:thumbsup:
broken_legs
Originally posted by funkytuqe
Wow, some god info in this thread.
I have my Electronics Enginnering Tecnology. I have been working for Nortel for the past 6 years and i want OUT!! What would you guys recomend??




I'm a EET too


Try Schlumberger, usually they make you go through 2 interviews but they hired me after 15 minutes. I think they are desperate for people.

A friend of mine (also eet) was hired into the last batch and out of 30 people they hired only 2 wanted to do MWD.

The potential for 6 figure salary within 2 years of working there is very real.


Its not likely you will get a 9-5 job in town doing R&D. Schlum usually hires field people to do that after a few years as I understand things. Most of the people working for Schlum are all highly educated.

broken_legs
Originally posted by awd


What is his name? I was in that batch too. ;)



Did you go to Red Deer with them for the interview?

forum8
Hey everyone,

I have this trip to calgary/red deer on the 20th. What locations did they offer placements in? Do salary's differ for each of the segments? I'm kinda clueless what happens in the field, but i guess i'll find out.

Thanks for any input.
broken_legs
Originally posted by awd


Yep, two day trip -- overnight in red deer.



Do you remember a larger fellow by the name of James?

Hes around 21-22

BTW: Which job did you take?

forum8
Hey what should I expect during this trip to calgary/red deer? Do you get interviewed again or do they just show you around? Are jeans ok for the meetings?
awd
Originally posted by forum8
Hey what should I expect during this trip to calgary/red deer? Do you get interviewed again or do they just show you around? Are jeans ok for the meetings?



pm me dude.

broken_legs
I wish I got a free trip to Red Deer and a free dinner
forum8
I got an offer for medicine hat, I'll probably take it. They just said well services, i hope they have fracing there.
stealth
WHat specific program can you take to become a MWD. Right now I got screwed over at NAIT for Power Engineering, and they told me they can accept me at the Fairview Campus for power engineering. My second choice was Petroleum Engineering, but that is full.

Is the only course available for MWD Petro Eng?

Thx

Sam
broken_legs
i think any kind of techincal diploma in electrical or electronics is preferred - anyone else?
pegasus
MWD... seems like doing MWD will get you alot of experience than wireline?

I am a mechanical engineer from university of windsor... What segment would be good for me? seemsl ike MWD and wireline are more college diploma segments? or i might be wrong?
Rat Fink
Originally posted by pegasus

I am a mechanical engineer from university of windsor... What segment would be good for me? seemsl ike MWD and wireline are more college diploma segments? or i might be wrong?



Depends, there are wireline companies that require you to have an engineering education to become a supervisor. However, I can tell you not all companies are like that. I worked for one wireline company where my supervisor had a grade 8 education and 20 years in the field, but I got into a daily argument with him about how a megger measures resistance...not voltage :banghead:

He insisted it measured voltage. No concept at all of basic electrical work. I loved how the supervisors spent 30 minutes in the shop trying to measure DC voltage at the cablehead with their multimeter set to AC voltage. At what point could I not take the stupidity any longer?....at 8 months. Also took a retard rolling a wireline truck full of explosives in the ditch to make me realize its time to pack up and get out of that company. I was supposed to be on that truck in the passenger seat but was driving the supervisors pickup instead. Buddy who rolled the truck was hammering through the coffee like a madman and took 3 piss breaks on a 2 hour drive but kept insisting he was okay to drive. Anyone else on the truck would've died from that dude's ego and stupidity.

I know not all of the wireliners are dummies....but there are definately some poorly run outfits in Alberta.

Number one...get with a company that has a strict drug/alcohol policy. That will cut a lot of the dangers out from the start. When I started with that wireline company they asked me how much time I needed to clean up before the drug test. :banghead:

broken_legs
I'm guessing your not going to get any different answers by diggin up more old MWD threads.

This one was mine from when I started back in 2005.

To be a Wireline ENGINEER with Schlumberger, you need to have an engineering degree.

To be a MWD/LWD/DD ENGINEER with Schlumberger, you need to have an engineering degree.

If you want to be a "specialist" with SLB you don't need an engineering degree. Engineers have a higher salary but much less day rate. Specialists make less salary and much higher day rate.

I would make a list of all the questions you have and ask in your interview.



Here is what Drilling and Measurements does:


World Records Smashed for Longest and Highest Ratio Well

Extended Reach Drilling
Worldwide, Schlumberger technology has now contributed to six of the top seven extended reach directional projects.

Schlumberger team helps Maersk Oil Qatar break ten records with extended reach offshore well.

Worldwide, Schlumberger technology has now contributed to six of the top seven extended reach directional projects. The latest, drilled in the Al Shaheen Field offshore Qatar, broke the previous record length by 2,000 ft., reaching a total depth of 40,320 ft. Total step-out distance from the surface location was 35,770 ft.

In all, the well set 10 records including:

* longest well ever drilled
* longest along-hole departure (37, 956 ft)
* longest 8 1/2-in. section (35, 449 ft)
* highest ERD ratio (AHD/TVD): 10.485
* highest Directional Drilling Difficulty Index (DDI): 8.279
* deepest directional control
* deepest downlink, MWD transmission and LWD Geosteering (40,320 ft)
* deepest battery-less operation
* longest reservoir contact (35,449 ft)
* longest open hole

The 8 1/2-in. horizontal section was drilled in two runs with the PowerDrive X5 and PowerDrive Xceed RSS. The TeleScope high-speed telemetry-while-drilling system transmitted geosteering information in real-time and continuous measurements of parameters that affect drilling efficiency. The system also ensured that downlinking commands were received by the bottomhole assembly all the way to total depth. Continuous trajectory control enabled drillers to keep the wellbore within the 3 ft. 'sweet spot' of the 10 ft thick reservoir 95% of the time.

For the first time, totally battery-less LWD triple combo equipment was used. The TeleScope, geoVISION and adnVISION systems were powered by a turbine generator driven by drilling fluid circulation.

The record-breaking performance involved a Schlumberger D&M team assigned to the customer for more than a year. Drilling engineers located in Maersk's offices provided close collaboration and Operation Support Center (OSC) engineers ensured clear communications and vital data were available for decision-making. Repair and Maintenance personnel prepared and tested the equipment.

"Extended reach drilling is a natural application of our high-performance drilling technology," said Mike Williams, global sales manager, Drilling & Measurements, Schlumberger. "This helps our customers access more reservoir volumes from a single drill site, reducing overall costs and environmental impact."




I just don't think Wireline ever gets that exciting, but maybe that's just me.

pegasus
ah. gotcha. I am really leaning towards MWD engineer at Schlumberger...
So this day rate thing..
You get your normal yearly salary and then an extra day rate on top of that? never heard of such a thing... lol can't say No to extra money tho...
ye i am making a list of questions... trna target more MWD stuff... and drill optimization related....if worse comes to worse and they have nothing else available I will take wireline...I just want to go through this training process...it just sounds amazing.
pegasus
what segment will get me to travel alot? and more marketable to other companies within oil and gas?
broken_legs
Originally posted by pegasus
what segment will get me to travel alot? and more marketable to other companies within oil and gas?



1.)Already answered here:

http://forums.beyond.ca/showthread....mp;pagenumber=5

2.) Drilling Optimization is not a segment.

3.) You will not get a job doing Drilling Optimization unless you have drilling experience. Experience you would gain via D&M.

4.) Doesn't make much sense that they are interviewing you a year before you grad. Are you sure you aren't getting interviewed for a student work term?

pegasus
Originally posted by broken_legs


1.)Already answered here:

http://forums.beyond.ca/showthread....mp;pagenumber=5

2.) Drilling Optimization is not a segment.

3.) You will not get a job doing Drilling Optimization unless you have drilling experience. Experience you would gain via D&M.

4.) Doesn't make much sense that they are interviewing you a year before you grad. Are you sure you aren't getting interviewed for a student work term?



Nope. Already done 4 work terms with a year at Syncrude R&D in Edmonton.

They are interviewing for Field Engineer position...likely in Alberta.
atleast thats what they said in my phone interview...and thats the job i applied for.

I have heard oil companies usually recruit students a year in advance from university.

interesting...for drilling optimization... D&M is needed....and D&M is like downhole measurements...MWD...LWd..etc...

So ... MWD it is... lol seems like the most interesting...stuff. hopefully i get it...

Supa Dexta
MWD can be boring as fuk too, but thats not a bad thing. If you're out mountain drilling at a meter an hour and only need to survey every say 6-8 m, theres 6 or 8 hours you'll just be sitting there not doing anything except surfing and watching tv. ha..

But on the other end of things, I'm out doing oilsands driling right now, and it can be fast as shit (hitting 200-500m an hour at times), with some pretty intense tools. So depending on where you're drilling it can be balls to to the wall, or sit back and click a few buttons. Pay is good, but there is a TON to learn and be responsible for. Especially pad drilling where you could screw many many wells, with one screw up.

I sort of wish I was a directional driller.. Now theres some easy money..:rofl:

Also I don't know a lot about wireline, but I do know theres nothing better then sitting in the shack when it's -40, looking at the rig out the window, rather then working outside.
pegasus
Originally posted by Supa Dexta
MWD can be boring as fuk too, but thats not a bad thing. If you're out mountain drilling at a meter an hour and only need to survey every say 6-8 m, theres 6 or 8 hours you'll just be sitting there not doing anything except surfing and watching tv. ha..

But on the other end of things, I'm out doing oilsands driling right now, and it can be fast as shit (hitting 200-500m an hour at times), with some pretty intense tools. So depending on where you're drilling it can be balls to to the wall, or sit back and click a few buttons. Pay is good, but there is a TON to learn and be responsible for. Especially pad drilling where you could screw many many wells, with one screw up.

I sort of wish I was a directional driller.. Now theres some easy money..:rofl:

Also I don't know a lot about wireline, but I do know theres nothing better then sitting in the shack when it's -40, looking at the rig out the window, rather then working outside.





Wireline seems like alot of work too tho... especially Open hole.

haha oilsands? for whom? suncor..syncrude...cnrl..??

pegasus
I just really want this job... I wanna learn as much as possible...and am very ambitious.

just sent my city and province... windsor/ontario... gonna be flying out of there... calgary...red deer. 2 days. i really hope i get this job...

Mwd is what i will give my preference too... I like challenging work... lol i hope there r some rigsi n the middle of the rockies.... wud beu nreal.... do some backcountry powder snowboarding during breaks...

and as for -40.... I have already done that... -57 fort mcmurray installing strain gauges on the equipment.
Supa Dexta
Nah I'm in coldlake right now for imperial.. I used to work firebag and great divide... etc. quite a bit. Some fort mackay stuff for PC.
pegasus
Originally posted by Supa Dexta
Nah I'm in coldlake right now for imperial.. I used to work firebag and great divide... etc. quite a bit. Some fort mackay stuff for PC.



ah. imperial eh... another company that i would love to work for.

broken_legs
Originally posted by Supa Dexta

I sort of wish I was a directional driller.. Now theres some easy money..:rofl:



Well Im doing both right now. Once your on the other side of things MWD seems pretty unimportant. Things change once you have the DD responsibility. I just did the build, tangent and drop in one bit run drilling @ 40m/hr with rotary steerable and it was pretty intense. I'm sure it will be less stressful with time, but I also know that having the responsibility of the whole directional operation on your shoulders is a lot different than just running the tools.



Heres what work looks like:

















Supa Dexta
click for larger version
» Click image for larger version

:rofl:
pegasus
hahaha those r sikkk.

so much snowwwww! lol BC would be too cool to work. Go snowboarding during breaks around the valley... find some jumps. goodtimes.
broken_legs
Originally posted by Supa Dexta
click for larger version
» Click image for larger version

:rofl:




I got that email too! :rofl:

Oldskool
Originally posted by broken_legs



I got that email too! :rofl:



:rofl:

How did they notice that? no mud returns? or did they see the geiser they created?

Whiley
LOL nice, that's one to put on your resume
"look guys, i DD great, didn't hit a thing" :rofl:

Originally posted by Supa Dexta
click for larger version
» Click image for larger version

RatherBePerfin
Originally posted by pegasus
Wireline seems like alot of work too tho... especially Open hole.



Cased hole wireline can be a lot of work. But as an engineer it will depend how much you want to be part of the team. Typically engineers don't have to get involved with too much of the physical work unless they are running single o. And even then I've known some engineers or field supervisors who sit in the recorder cab and stare through the window and just watch the physical work get done. Pretty lousy as far as I'm concerned.

Stress level can be pretty high, you are usually under the gun and have to put a lot of faith in your drivers. If you have inexperienced guys out back, your life can be hell. Your days can be long and tiring, especially if you are doing lots of logging because you are pretty much just stuck sitting in one spot all day bored out of your mind.

In my opinion, out of all the work you have mentioned I think cased hole wireline can vary the greatest in job details depending on the area you work in and who you are working for(I may be wrong here so imform me if I am). Shallow gas can be fast paced and boring as hell. Oil work can be a PITA because of clean up, and it seems rig crews are always behind schedule on oil wells. Being half way between the heavy oil and gas work can really suck (pretty much always stuck with a ton of post job cleanup). In higher pressure areas you can bounce back and forth between running a grease head and standard packoff and have to tie cable heads a lot, and also use a lot of pressure control equipment every day. In southeast Sask on the other hand, pressure control is usually minimal (packoff and flange). The post job cleanup can also vary a lot depending on the area or station you work in. And depending where you work you can cover work on a number of wells in a day so preparation can be tedious, and it also adds to the stress of having the day go problem free to avoid costing a customer down time.

I will honestly say you should avoid wireline if you can. I've been doing it for 2 years now and have come to realize that there are few people who enjoy this job, and the happiest wireliners are usually ex-wireliners. A lot of guys eventually feel trapped because they like the money and don't want to risk making a job change. But I know a lot of guys that have moved on to lower paying jobs just to get out of the lifestyle.

pegasus
seems like..

MWD... fun job...good future... good knowledge...etc...but less pay...

Wireline....shit job....big pay...

i wud rather go for something thats a fun job...that can give me the most knowledge... and set me in a future towards management or technical toward drill optimization...
RatherBePerfin
Don't get me wrong, wireline can be a blast at times, but it can also be erratic. There are times when sleep and work come first, eat when you can and nothing else matters. Then there are times when the days are short and your entire shop can do something fun like go out golfing on a Friday afternoon. But who you work for can make a big difference as there are some companies right now that seldom work and others that seldom get a chance to rest. As a driver the long days and physical work can get pretty overwelming, but I don't know if the same goes for field supervisors/engineers or not. I am currently in a dillema where I am next in line at my shop to be trained as a field supervisor but not sure if I want to take it when the time comes.

MWD probably pays better on average than wireline, not? Again the regional thing really comes into play with wireline.... some of the shallow gas and heavy oil work is bid at insane prices and it takes a lot of work to get the bonus built up.
broken_legs
If you can do cased hole and sleep in your own bed every night than I think thats a pretty good option. Not sure if he still posts on here but AWD seemed to have a pretty good gig going out of Red Deer? I think



To me the biggest difference between wireline and D&M will always be this:


Do you want to live/sleep/work here:




or Here





Lots of D&M guys quit right away once they realize there may be more money at another company, or that the hours aren't what they wanted, but ont he other hand most of the guys that have been around for a long time have been around for a LONG time. we have many 10+ year guys here.

I'm guessing not having to work out of a truck adds to longevity in the field.
pegasus
man that's so cool.

D&M D&M!!!

all the way
SJW
I'm going to be honest with all of you guys.

MWD is the highest paying/work load ratio job ever.

You just have to deal with stress well and keep your gear in tip top shape.

I was field for 7 years and I now have 10 years experience doing it. If any of you guys want to know anything feel free to ask me via PM. I'll be 100% honest about Schlumberger and their practices.

Like i said before they have the best tools in the biz and their training is fantastic, but they don't have a clue about keeping their employees happy.

Later skaters.
SJW
Oh and by the way if you want to know what a top MWD hand makes as a consultant. Its around 150,000 to 200,000 a year. Depending on how much he/she wants to work.
KRyn
Message LT247 he is a MWD currently working for Kambi.
monopauly
Hey guys,

I have been an MWD for 5 years now, It is a great job for the money. Just be prepared to spend alot of time away from home.

I live in calgary, and I work about 200 days a year.

Could you guys let me know how much you get paid and your experience? I just recently made the jump to consultant and I want to make sure I get a fair rate.

I have 5 years experience on every tool my company has and am making $725 per day plus $50 sub and $1 per km.

Cheers!
themack89
I'd say shop around for what you really wanna do..

I'm just starting out with Halliburton and there's tons of crap available if you wanna stick around and shake some hands. Wireline, Tools, Cementing, Foam, Logging/Perf, Frac, Nitrogen, Bulk, etc.. Just sleep around and learn it all! Pretty interesting stuff if you ask me.

Make it be known to your managers of all the skills you posses outside of your degree. On my resume all I put was Class 1 license and some lease handing, but definitely letting everyone know on my crew that I can run a computer inside and out. It's making me the next prime candidate to be the commander of a foam van, and then more doors start to open as time goes on etc.

There's soooo much shit to learn and explore, don't get tunnel vision and focus on just one thing for the money or days on/off (unless that's all you're into).

BTW, if you ever make it into the field with that degree you got.. At least 'try' to hammer some iron, be part of the crew.
broken_legs
Originally posted by monopauly
Hey guys,

I have been an MWD for 5 years now, It is a great job for the money. Just be prepared to spend alot of time away from home.

I live in calgary, and I work about 200 days a year.

Could you guys let me know how much you get paid and your experience? I just recently made the jump to consultant and I want to make sure I get a fair rate.

I have 5 years experience on every tool my company has and am making $725 per day plus $50 sub and $1 per km.

Cheers!



Sounds like you are on the mid to high range of MWD consulting spectrum.

Most consulting places I know of are starting guys at ~ 500/day day rate, + 100 GR, + 100kms, + Sub etc... All in they are only getting 700/day, if you are getting 700 for just day rate I'd say you are doing alright.

Now Ive also heard there are some STUD MWD hands over at phoenix that can watch movies better than anyone - They are apparently making close to 900/day.

Hope that helps.

The_gateway
Hi,
got an offer from SLB doing coiled tubing - anyone know what i'm getting into? Looking for people's opinions.
Seems to be okay, other than retarded hours.
broken_legs
Originally posted by The_gateway
Hi,
got an offer from SLB doing coiled tubing - anyone know what i'm getting into? Looking for people's opinions.
Seems to be okay, other than retarded hours.




you work on a truck. have fun....


http://www.slb.com/services/coiled_tubing.aspx

The_gateway
Originally posted by broken_legs



you work on a truck. have fun....


http://www.slb.com/services/coiled_tubing.aspx



I've read their website front/back, inside and out. What i'm looking for is personal experiences working with them. I've googled them and heard some horror stories - one guy said they were the "walmart of the oilfield" I.E. thousands of employees, ridiculously low pay and really high turnover.

A2VR6
Originally posted by The_gateway


I've read their website front/back, inside and out. What i'm looking for is personal experiences working with them. I've googled them and heard some horror stories - one guy said they were the "walmart of the oilfield" I.E. thousands of employees, ridiculously low pay and really high turnover.


What you just wrote is true. I'm a open hole wireliner with Slb and morale is in the dumpster here in llyod and engineers are dropping like flies due to the horrendous pricing they have here in heavy oil (not alot for job bonus). Management here has been incompetent at best. Alot of the bad managers have been transferred out so we'll see how things change. But one thing I can say is that the training provided here is second to none... It's very good.

The_gateway
Well I think my 12 month plan is to get all the training and then get the heck outta there. I guess i'm thinking too much into it, but there are just so many reviews online that says they have gone downhill...I can\t ignore what the majority of people are saying about it.
I dunno, just take the job and see where it goes from there I guess:)



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