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View Full Version : Where to invest large sum of money



Gorilla
07-10-2006, 02:13 PM
I have a large sum of money that came from a previous investment and I want to reinvest it again. What would you recommend?

LAND, CONDO's, STOCKS, RRSP, BUSINESS?

Rockski
07-10-2006, 02:14 PM
the price of land can only go up

Weapon_R
07-10-2006, 02:15 PM
BMO dividend fund or similar

Rav4Guy
07-10-2006, 04:16 PM
It all depends on time frame, risk, objectives, etc.

that's a pretty open ended question. :D

shakalaka
07-10-2006, 04:23 PM
Some sorta business if you ready to put in the effort and time. Or land/flats always a good investment. Stocks are more sorta gambling, you need to be following it really close or just be super lucky to do good in them.

lint
07-10-2006, 04:24 PM
talking to a financial advisor >> asking on beyond
especially with a large sum of money

black_radiation
07-10-2006, 04:34 PM
...my pocket is an investment.... ill take your money:) lol, jk housing man, buy a house, do a little work on it, turn around and sell it for a hefty profit... its eventually gonna stop but not any time soon

Kirbs17
07-10-2006, 04:51 PM
west jet is looking like a mighty good stock:devil:

Tik-Tok
07-10-2006, 08:48 PM
Originally posted by Kirbs17
west jet is looking like a mighty good stock:devil:

Lol, westjet shares are only a good idea if you work for westjet (because they match you dollar for dollar up to $20G a year or something). Have you seen their stock lately? $11/share :thumbsdow

AndrewMZ3
07-10-2006, 10:35 PM
You need to provide more info as to what you're looking for from the investment.

ie. Time frame, liquidity, your risk tolerance, expected return, your tax situation, etc etc.

Rav4Guy
07-11-2006, 11:17 AM
^ but that's what I said! lol.

investment advisor > financial advisor... IMO!

Celica TVS3
07-13-2006, 09:38 PM
It all depends on what you consider a large sum of money.

$5,000, $10,000, $25,000, $50,000, $100,000, $250,000, $500,000, $1,000,000+

Obvously the investment stratagies for each of this amounts would differ greatly. As Rav4Guy said it depends alot on your requirments from the money. You're probably young so a primary residance might be a starting point, if you've allready have that covered you'd likely want to start saving for retirement - which would mean that you have a fairly long investment period that would allow you to create a balanced portfolio consisting of stocks and bonds (being overweight on the stocks). As far as which stocks to buy and how you should structure your portfolio you should seek the help of an investment advisor.

irfaan
07-14-2006, 12:47 AM
the pipelines:)

the_new_santa1
07-14-2006, 01:03 AM
Truthfully, The thing to do is find some lake.....I know it sound crazy, but find some lake that is just in the development stages...buy a chunk of lakefront property wait 10-15 years an retire when you sell it, happened with chestermere and will happen again....

eblend
07-29-2006, 10:16 PM
well i am in a similar boat right now, not very large sum, but about 10gs that I want to make some money on. right now its in a savings account but i want somehting that pays a little better and very little risk. What do you recommned

umreeka91
07-29-2006, 10:18 PM
Originally posted by eblend
well i am in a similar boat right now, not very large sum, but about 10gs that I want to make some money on. right now its in a savings account but i want somehting that pays a little better and very little risk. What do you recommned

get a better car :bigpimp:

eblend
07-29-2006, 10:21 PM
Originally posted by umreeka91


get a better car :bigpimp:
don't be dissin on the power wheels man, that sht is hot.

seriously thought, i got a good car as is, my next good car will be about 70gs,so got some saving to do haha, hence the reason want my money to be making some money while it sits there

Celica TVS3
07-30-2006, 02:32 AM
^ If you want VERY little risk open a savings account at PC Financial in Superstore. They now offer 4% interest + a small annual bonus. It costs you nothing to open, no fees... It's at least a good place to park the cash untill you decide what you want to do with it.

turbotrip
07-30-2006, 02:46 AM
real estate is still hot, try to get involved in the development end, lots of small developers are asking for funds, but some are pretty shady so u gotta be weary.

eblend
07-31-2006, 10:53 PM
Originally posted by Celica TVS3
^ If you want VERY little risk open a savings account at PC Financial in Superstore. They now offer 4% interest + a small annual bonus. It costs you nothing to open, no fees... It's at least a good place to park the cash untill you decide what you want to do with it.

already did that :) already had a pc financial account, so just opened the new savings account with 4%. gonna leave it for now until i decide.

thanks

SteveMo600
07-31-2006, 11:53 PM
Originally posted by eblend
well i am in a similar boat right now, not very large sum, but about 10gs that I want to make some money on. right now its in a savings account but i want somehting that pays a little better and very little risk. What do you recommned

I would suggest some low risk mutal funds or some income trusts. They should give you gains with very little risk.

That or bank bonds...that'll get you some guaranteed cash flows and is better than a savings account interest.

Talk to your bank about these options. All of these choices are very little risk.

silbergrau330
08-08-2006, 03:17 PM
Until your maxing out your RRSP's, dont bother hitting any funds or trusts. RRSPs first, then when they are covered, you are free to dabble in some other areas.

Celica TVS3
08-08-2006, 04:59 PM
Originally posted by SteveMo600

I would suggest some low risk mutual funds or some income trusts. They should give you gains with very little risk.

That or bank bonds...that'll get you some guaranteed cash flows and is better than a savings account interest.

Talk to your bank about these options. All of these choices are very little risk.

Income trusts are not "very little risk" - although most have paid a consistent distribution they are by no means a fixed income instrument.



Originally posted by silbergrau330
Until your maxing out your RRSP's, donít bother hitting any funds or trusts. RRSPs first, then when they are covered, you are free to dabble in some other areas.

An RRSP in itself isnít' an investment it's simply a favorable tax structure on a particular type of account. You can hold mutual funds, stocks, bonds, income trusts... within an RRSP.

silbergrau330
08-08-2006, 06:14 PM
Originally posted by Celica TVS3

Clearly you shouldn't be offering advice. An RRSP in itself isnít' an investment it's simply a favorable tax structure on a particular type of account. You can hold mutual funds, stocks, bonds, income trusts... within an RRSP.

I think you misunderstood what I was saying, I was not identifying how a RRSP works. I was simply saying RRSP's are an extremely beneficial form of investment/saving/tax savings, and easily accessable for everyone, so I would work towards first maxing out your RRSP contribution and THEN when you have done so for the year, you are free to broaden your portfolio. I was simply saying utilize RRSP first, then explore other avenues. But thank you for your insightful contribution! :poosie:

Celica TVS3
08-09-2006, 07:28 PM
^ Sorry if I misunderstood you - rereading my response it seems quite brass. But you're right maxing out your RRSP contributions is a good idea.