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View Full Version : 250 & 400cc bikes, unatainable?



l/l/rX
08-06-2003, 10:25 PM
oookay im getting ahead of myself here. dont even have bike license, (next summer :banghead: ) anyways i've been reeeaaaalllly interested in bikes lately. hmm and i've been looking for some good begginer bikes to get to start riding with my dad.

anywho, i've been really interested in the 250cc and 400cc bikes. mostly yamaha's 1992ish Yamaha FZR 250 R , but also the new kawasaki 1997ish+ ZXR 400

my dad has told me the 250cc and 400cc bikes are HELLA hard to get a hold of. something like "J-Spec" bikes. only available in japan. soo my question to you guys is have any of you ever gotten a 250/400 bike shipped here? how hard was it, where did you buy from etc etc. and why the hell these bikes are so uncommon here in N.A. i thought there would be a big demand for these begginer bikes. anyways thanx for helping me out

edit: also that kawasaki 1997 would be great because it sits a hell lot lower than the 2000 r6. which would be perfect for my size :) AHA

ryder_23
08-07-2003, 01:15 AM
Uhh. my buddy got a 250 pretty easy ways back, same yr ur looking for. I've seen alot in edmonton when i had the bike buy/sell whatever its called ways back.

bikrbabe
08-07-2003, 10:29 AM
yeah, you can get the kawasaki ZZR250's

they're pretty good bikes, I rode on one back in April for a few hours and was quite impressed (considering it was only a 250... lol..)

but for a begginer bike, they're awesome! If you were looking to keep the bike for a while, I'd check out the ninja 500 that kawasaki makes... that will last you more than just one riding season. you might grow out of the 250 a little quickly. I know most of my friends that got one grew out of it pretty quick

DSMer4Life
08-07-2003, 11:40 AM
The only reasoning I can fathom why these bikes did not end up in North American dealerships is that we have a taste for larger vehicles in general (i.e. V8s). So, +600cc bikes would probably be the most profitable to export here.

However, you can bring bikes over form Japan, just like cars. They must be 15 years old, so you'd be looking at 1988 and older bikes. I'm not sure of all the regulations and procedures necessary, but it can be done.

Another option, besides buying new, is to look for old smaller bikes. My neighbor sold me my 81 Kawasaki KZ 440LTD for cheap. It had roughly 20,000kms on it, newer tires and was in decent shape. It's still hard to find smaller ones, but there are plenty of older Japanese bikes to choose from. You just have to make sure all the basics are in good running order (engine, chain, brakes, etc). I know they don't look sporty, but my bike weighs about what a newer sport bike would weigh (407lbs wet), and even less when you talk about bigger sport bikes. So, you can learn all the basics on a bike you won't feel bad to lay down. Just another option for you to consider. I think they are actually going up in value these days too. I know I love my Kawy! Good luck hunting.

l/l/rX
08-07-2003, 03:22 PM
welpz they did sell the yamaha 250's here. they sold SOME 250's here in N.A. just hard to find them here. this was back in the day though. the 1992's n such. but they stopped selling them here because the market for them sucked.

hey ryder_23 where did your buddy get his 250 from? somewhere in calgary like a shop? er was it a private sell?

ryder_23
08-07-2003, 03:33 PM
I can find out if you'd like. I was a 250 ninja or something, just as a starter, he sold it privatly i can tell you that much. I do believe he just bought it from canada trader, etc... I'll get more details later

legendboy
08-07-2003, 03:35 PM
Don't bother with either of thoes. You will regret it the second day after you start riding it!

l/l/rX
08-07-2003, 03:54 PM
Originally posted by legendboy
Don't bother with either of thoes. You will regret it the second day after you start riding it!

welpz by the time next year comes around i highly doubt i'll grow much compared to now. when i sit on my dads R6, both my feet arent on the ground. :( i still need to grow AT LEAST, hmm...2-4" for both feet to be planted on the ground AHAHA fuuuudgers. the kawasaki ZXR sits 60mm lower than the r6. 6cm isnt a whole lot, but hey every cm helps. soo what im saying im looking for something that'll "fit" me. heh. damn azn shortness LOL.

Ducati
02-02-2004, 12:10 AM
The Yamaha FZR400 was sold here through the late eighties and early nineties. If you can find a decent one, snap it up. Great bike - performane on par with a Ducati 748. I know this from personal experience.

Honda sold a sporting standard 400cc four in the early nineties called a CB1. Other than a reputation for not having a particularily comfortable seat, it is supposedly a great bike. Order a new seat by Corbin or Mustang.

There is a little gray market shop in Vancouver called Atlas Motorcycles, that always has a good selection of small gray market imports, in both 2 and 4 stroke.
If I could lay my hands on a gray market CBR400RR, I would seriously look vary hard at my finances to buy it.

Finally, if you want a lightweight fun bike, and have an appreciation for two strokes, check out the fairly available Yamaha TZ250, regardless of what Legendboy says. I have ridden one and found it quite entertaining. Okay, the Kaw Ninja 250 may be a bit aniemic for anything more serious than riding to work in heavy traffic, but it is still a good reliable bike that you might want to at least take for a test ride.

angierideswitme
02-02-2004, 12:20 AM
just get moped!!!

method
02-02-2004, 12:23 AM
seriously, I ride a scooter. a fucking scooter.

there's always gonna be something faster than you, dont feel the need to somehow buy the fastest bike out there.

Ducati
02-02-2004, 09:19 PM
I forgot the 1988 to mid nineties Suzuki Bandit 400. I saw one today and realized my error of omission. Beautiful red with a red frame.

Has anyone ever owned one of these little 400cc bikes?

m10-power
02-03-2004, 11:56 AM
Yamaha FZR 400 if your after that sportbike look
Suzuki Bandit 400 is an awesome little bike but has no fairings
Suzuki GS500 is a great little bike to learn, much shorter then a R6.
I wouldnt recommend a 250cc four stroke, quite dull...
The others you wont find, which is a shame because they would be great starter bikes. Too bad everyone has to have a 1000cc bike...:dunno:

As for the TZ250? not street legal and definately not a 'beginners bike", perhaps the TZR250 which was available in Canada in the '80s.

RZ350's would be good too.

Hey Ducati, I can't seem to get Atlas's website to come up are they still in business?

www.greybike.com was the link I found, but its dead...

Ducati
02-03-2004, 12:47 PM
I drove by there the other day and noticed a Yamaha dealership or something. I couldn't stop and gawk for too long lest I be beset by squeegie kids and drunks.

I bought an FZR400 gray market bike from them in 2000, for $3200. They had an incredible selection of small sportbikes. I will miss that place.

There are two more places to try; Modern Mororcycles, on Commercial Drive often has Gray Market bikes. There is also a place in Squamish that handles these sub-500 cc bikes, but I know nothing about them.

m10-power
02-03-2004, 04:03 PM
What year was your FZR? I have an '88 that I would use to register my newer FZR400RR SP :D

Ducati
02-03-2004, 10:19 PM
1985!
It was a Japan Only colour, too. Do you recall that light blue that the 1988 or 1989 RZ350 came in? (apparently the best RZ, I am told) It made the bike stand out in light blue with dark blue accents and yellow striping.

I prefer the white red and black livery, but the 2tone blue was unique.

That is the bike I smashed up in the last ever instance of drinking and riding that I will ever do. I am lucky not to have been popped for DUI. I sold its corpse to a friend who now races it.

I miss that great little bike. It was capable of suprising my brother-in-law on his 748, right up to mega-criminal speeds, when he would gradually pass me when the FZR400 topped out at just over 200.

m10-power
02-04-2004, 12:16 PM
Ah you had a FZ400R, bit different. I have always liked the 400cc sportbikes, my FZR400 is amazing although broken at the moment. I was thinking of building it up, FZR600 crank, rods and cylinders. Change to a 17" rear wheel as 18" tires are hard to find in anything modern.

bluespyder
02-04-2004, 01:19 PM
It is very possible to get a J-spec over, but it requires a bit of trick and luck.

There are only two sizes you should look into, 250 and 400. As far as 250 is concern, get the 2-strokes, they are so much fun. I got my NSR 250 over at Altas Motorcycle in Vancouver (they might have changed the name). If you can find a TZR 250, that's great too.

But you are like me, who is sick of kick starting your bike in the morning, try to get your hand on the Honda VFR 400 line-up or RVF 400 (here's a picture of my RVF). With a redline of 14,000, and great handling, you should be able to keep up with the 600cc class in the canyon (oh yea, the bike looks great too).

Legally, you can import a motorcycle into Canada as long as the bike is 15 years or older. BTW, try not to get a 250cc 4-stroke, you will outgrow the bike within a week.

bluespyder
02-04-2004, 01:22 PM
RVF400

method
02-04-2004, 03:29 PM
what's the feasability of getting parts for j-spec bikes over here?

I sure do like the 250 2-strokes, and even the 4 stroke 400s seem pretty cool.

buh_buh
02-04-2004, 03:55 PM
http://forums.beyond.ca/showthread.php?s=&threadid=25456

m10-power
02-04-2004, 04:50 PM
That's a girls bike :thumbsup:

Street legal not very likely, although a '90(manufactured '89) FZR400RR will be legal this year.

The 250 2 strokes are maybe not such a good choice for street use, its very hard to ride them 50km/h or less this is usually 1st gear and out of the powerband. The 400 4 strokes are peaky but still usable. They can be made to be very quick and are razor sharp handling wise.

Bluespyder where are you from?

Ducati
02-04-2004, 07:09 PM
Then I'm growing tits. That is a nice small sportbike.
I concur with the 2 stroke observations, as riding the TZ or TZR around town would be a pain in the ass, but I did not have problems riding my H1 Kaw., Bultaco, RD400 Yamaha or RZ around town. Two strokes can be a bit disconcerting to those who expect engine braking, though.

I have parts out being powdercoated for two 2 strokes that I am presently restoring.

bluespyder
02-05-2004, 01:24 AM
Orginally, I am from Vancouver, but currently, I am living in suburb outside Los Angeles, a bit North of Malibu, where you can ride all year long.

I tend to disagree on the usage of the 2 storkes in the city. I had a NSR250, it was light, fast and small, it manueuver between cars and tight spot with ease. I loved it. Once I had a 1400cc curiser pulled next to me, he looked over at my bike with the 250 sticker, he laughed. I revved up to 9000rpm, and drop the clutch, he tried, but I never saw him again...

As for finding parts for the J-spec bike, I never really had any problems, they are not that hard to come by. The NSR or VFR forum are very very helpfull, and as long as you have the parts' number, any Honda dealer can get the parts for you. Or make friends with some wielding buddies.

J-spec bikes? check out www.isibike.com




Originally posted by m10-power
That's a girls bike :thumbsup:

Street legal not very likely, although a '90(manufactured '89) FZR400RR will be legal this year.

The 250 2 strokes are maybe not such a good choice for street use, its very hard to ride them 50km/h or less this is usually 1st gear and out of the powerband. The 400 4 strokes are peaky but still usable. They can be made to be very quick and are razor sharp handling wise.

Bluespyder where are you from?

Dr. Lightspeed
02-05-2004, 09:56 AM
I used to have an 84 RZ500N all I can tell you is do not guage a bile totally by the amount of cc's a bike has. Those and the Suzuki Gamma I used to have rocked very hard. In their day they were on par with the huge CC machines like the Huricane 1000. The 1000 may have had more power but in a 1/4 mile race the differance was negligable. However in the curvy's sayy bye bye.

bluespyder
02-05-2004, 10:21 AM
getting a J-spec isn't that hard.

check out ebay:

There's a 1990 Suzuki RVG 250, where you can legally import into Canada

Or there are about 2-3 Aprilia RS 250, street legal for sale as well.

bol
02-05-2004, 11:39 AM
Originally posted by bluespyder


Or there are about 2-3 Aprilia RS 250, street legal for sale as well.



An Aprilia would be a horrible first bike. Not because they're bad bikes(I almost bought an RS250 a month ago as a track bike) but because parts are difficult(and expensive) to find.

Since it will be his first bike chances are very high that he will go down and minor or not, parts for an RS250 are going to be hard to find. There's nothing worse than having a bike sitting in the garage waiting for parts while it's +25C outside.


I'd seriously look at a Kawi EX500. They're fairly cheap, there are a lot around and they can take a beating. They sit fairly low too so you shouldn't have any problems touching the ground firmly.

Ducati
02-05-2004, 01:03 PM
I agree with Bol on the EX500. Great first bike.

Bluespyder - when you lived here, did you ride a Honda NSR250?
Just asking - the 2 stroke community here is not large.

And as far as twostrokes rocking hard, my RZ 350, which I owned at the same time as I owned an Eddiie Lawson Replica Kawasaki, would beat the ELR in the 1/4 mile, and handled infinitely better. The ELR was basically my Touring Bike.

RiCE-DaDDy
02-05-2004, 09:04 PM
rs250 is total race bike period! Not good for the street at all

also thery're expensive and parts are too

Ducati
02-05-2004, 11:20 PM
By the way, how much is the little 250 Aprilia twostroke?

I know that the big one is about $17K, with the top of the line version about $26...or is that right or not? I seriously doubt that I will get another Ducati - even after twenty five years of owning and riding Duc's because I am dissapointed with the local dealserships. Besides, the Aprilias intrigue me.

m10-power
02-06-2004, 11:21 AM
Originally posted by RiCE-DaDDy
rs250 is total race bike period! Not good for the street at all

also thery're expensive and parts are too

Aprilia RS250 is a street bike. There are several in town.

method
02-06-2004, 12:05 PM
how's that? they arent even being brought over without being registered as a non-highway use bike because they dont conform to any emissions specs..?

bol
02-06-2004, 01:03 PM
Originally posted by Ducati
By the way, how much is the little 250 Aprilia twostroke?
.


The RS250 is about $5k US on average... I haven't seen any up in Canada for sale and don't even know if they're street legal here. I can't see why not since motorcycle's don't exactly have crash standards and safety equipment like cars do, but I'm not up on my motorcycle import laws.

Ducati
02-06-2004, 11:11 PM
Lets see...$5000 x 1.36 exchange = $6800.00

I'll take one! Now, how to figure out the loopholes.

m10-power
02-09-2004, 09:43 AM
Originally posted by method
how's that? they arent even being brought over without being registered as a non-highway use bike because they dont conform to any emissions specs..?

Not sure exactly, I knew a fellow years ago that had an RGV 250 ('91ish) and he just went down to the border in BC and had them inspect the bike. I think he put a bunch of canadian import stickers in the right place(from other bikes) and they gave him a K22(I think that is what it is to register). Was simple for him, doesnt work like that any more...
I would guess they are either brought in as race bikes, insured and plated with another bikes registration. As long as its insured...

Likwid_Fire
02-23-2004, 03:22 PM
250's are attainable... i had one for a while. man that thing was fun.

then again, i didn't search very hard i drove past it sittin in the driveway with a sale sign on it...

clutch_dust
04-11-2004, 12:03 AM
What's the purpose of starter bikes? My very first bike was a suzuki TL1100 and you just gotta start out slow until you get the hang of it. I have my Yamaha now and I'm only 19. Seriously... just get a real bike.

method
04-11-2004, 12:36 PM
I bet you a motogp rider on a 250 2 stroke could destroy you on your 'real bike' :rolleyes:

Ducati
04-11-2004, 02:53 PM
C.D.; I have utterly humiliated guys like you on big sportbikes while riding my old FZR400 on the twisty road up to My. Baker, and along fast winding roads like Hyy 31A where point and shoot riding does not work. Anybody can pull a throttle and accelerate in a straight line - few know what to do when a series of corners approaches. I know several 45, 55, and 65 year old guys who ride small bikes like RZ350's etc. who can outride teenage supermen on 750/1100 spottbikes. (The small bike is their "winter Ride"; they also have RC51's, ow01 Yammies, 916/996's as their "good" bikes)

From your vast experience, what can you tell me about how to correctly enter an apex, where do you chop the throttle, and where to apply throttle? Can you define "countersteering"? Define how you would apply brakes if you had to slow down in a corner to avoid hitting a moose? What do you do if an improperly attached peice if luggage falls off and jams up your rear wheel at speed?

Your TL 1000 is a very very cool bike, no doubt - I really do like the later versions (the early ones were skittish) however I remain convinced that you learn best on a bike that you can wring out like a dishrag.

4wheeldrift
04-16-2004, 04:54 PM
Originally posted by Ducati
however I remain convinced that you learn best on a bike that you can wring out like a dishrag. Semi-off topic/thread hijacking moment but this is very true for cars as well. Excellent and insightful comment :thumbsup:

Soupy25
01-01-2012, 11:03 AM
Hi Guys,
What a great topic with great comments and strong points on the subject. I too am interested in purchasing a lightweight motorcycle. I had an YZ 125 when I was 13 years old and sold it when I was 18 years old as I was more into cars than motorcycles at that point. Iíve rode a few friendsí street bikes over the years but Iíd say Iím a beginner. Other good reasons for a light weight bike are based on the fact I rarely get up to 60 km/h (35 mi/h) in the city in my car and itís a coast to the next red light. I live in the Vancouver neighbourhood of Kitsilano so basically in the heart of the city so I donít need to drive very far or often so a motorcycle makeís sense I may even sell my car. Also, any motorcycle over 400cc is almost triple the insurance cost in British Columbia which sucks because the motorcycle manufactures sell 250cc then it jumps to 600-650cc except for the Suzuki GS 500. Iím not interested in a sport bike at all. I like the look of the old school standard bikes of the 60ís & 70ís and the bobber look.

I love the old 2 stroke standard bikes (RD, KH, GT) they have a small power band with awesome torque so if youíre looking for a bike that you have to engage with these are fun bikes but Iím not looking to cut thru traffic as much as cruise with it and I like my front wheel to stay on the ground! Theyíre around and not that difficult to find. Thereís a motorcycle shop in Calgary that fix and sell a nice range of 2 strokes road bikes which is so cool! I might take a road trip to Calgary just to checkout this shop. They advertise on craigslist http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/van/mcd/2732911725.html .

The 400cc four strokes are nice too but both are old and I donít want to have to work on it often, just enjoy riding it so Iíd prefer a newer bike. I prefer a V-twin for its look and sound even though the 250cc bikes look good (Virago now called the V-Star 250) the smaller displacement is too small for my liking. I really need a larger bike just for comfort alone. Itís just silly that the low insurance rates are based on below 400cc displacement and there is nothing over 250cc even imported to Canada since whatÖ1991-92? If the 2012 Suzuki 250 TU was a 400 Iíd be looking to get one of those. They sold so few 2008 Suzuki 250 TUís in the U.S. that Suzuki USA didnít import any 2009ís at all because of the surplus of 2008ís.

Scooters look like fun but noÖ. and pricey! Iíd rather have a Johnny Pag Custom than a scooter with his custom American style ďChineseĒ bikes which is pushing the envelope in price for a bike from China and itís not a V-twin. For $5400 Iíd rather save for another year and by myself a Sportster 883 Iron for $3k more. Itís actually very disappointing that we have such few choices in Canada when it comes to light weight motorcycles. If I want a 400cc motorcycle I get to choose between a scooter or a motorcycle over 20 years oldÖbrutal.

speedog
01-01-2012, 11:09 AM
Seriously?

An almost eight year bump?

Soupy25
01-01-2012, 12:45 PM
Originally posted by l/l/rX
welpz they did sell the yamaha 250's here. they sold SOME 250's here in N.A. just hard to find them here. this was back in the day though. the 1992's n such. but they stopped selling them here because the market for them sucked.

hey ryder_23 where did your buddy get his 250 from? somewhere in calgary like a shop? er was it a private sell?


He's another example of the bikes they have at Old Motorcycle Shop 4240-16 st s.e in Calgary. So cool!

http://vancouver.en.craigslist.ca/rds/mcd/2732993566.html

Graham_A_M
01-01-2012, 01:51 PM
Wow you must have done some serious searching to find this thread.
This is almost as old as Beyond itself.

Another bike you may want to take a look at would be the two strokes

Such as a Yamaha RZ350
Honda NSR250

My old '89 RZ350 would keep up to a new 600 until about 100kph, after that you really would notice the lack of power. Fastest I ever went on it was 170, but it took a *LONG* time to get it up to that.

There are a few on Kijiji, one there right now IIRC.
here
http://alberta.kijiji.ca/f-rz350-Classifieds-W0QQKeywordZrz350QQisSearchFormZtrue


Just something else to consider.
I sold my old one in almost mint condition for $2500, so not too hard to obtain either.


EDIT: Oh yeah I just remembered. Blackfoot still has that Aprillia RS125
this one.
http://www.blackfootonline.com/euro_productdetail.php?id=2158

I'd love to have it, its a blast, yet just sips the gas and will corner like a son-of-a-gun. Im sure insurance will be peanuts too.

HHURICANE1
01-02-2012, 09:07 AM
^ That Aprillia isn't street legal. The sales tag on the bike even says so. Pretty cool bike though.

kevie88
01-02-2012, 09:19 AM
Love this old thread! there's some pics of my newly resurrected VFR400R (and my wife doing some laps on it at Race City) in my flickr..

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kevie88

Front wheel and fender are out for paint now.

SJW
01-02-2012, 09:37 AM
Originally posted by kevie88
Love this old thread! there's some pics of my newly resurrected VFR400R (and my wife doing some laps on it at Race City) in my flickr..

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kevie88

Front wheel and fender are out for paint now.

Let me know when it's time to sell that bad boy.

kevie88
01-02-2012, 03:22 PM
I dunno if I ever will to be honest, I suppose if someone offered me silly money I'd part with it, but it's not original enough now to warrant big money. I regretted selling it last time I owned it so I hope it lives in my garage for many years to come.

Cooked Rice
01-09-2012, 05:41 AM
Originally posted by HHURICANE1
^ That Aprillia isn't street legal. The sales tag on the bike even says so. Pretty cool bike though.

I do recall they sold a few with conversion kits to be street legal

AG_Styles
01-09-2012, 10:27 PM
So there isn't a way to purchase a 2012 CBR250R in Calgary? I was hoping to pick one up when i get back.

energie88
01-09-2012, 10:31 PM
It is definitely possible, I was at the bike show and they had many of them on display. Your best bet would be http://www.rockymountainhondapowerhouse.com/ I talked to some of the guys there at the show and they were great although a bit high pressure sales :S!

Graham_A_M
01-09-2012, 10:33 PM
Originally posted by AG_Styles
So there isn't a way to purchase a 2012 CBR250R in Calgary? I was hoping to pick one up when i get back.

That bike is a dud in terms of performance, sounds retarded too. I'd grab a Ninja 250 long before I would one of those.

Originally posted by Cooked Rice


I do recall they sold a few with conversion kits to be street legal

Yeah theres ways around it.

GT4rally
01-10-2012, 04:23 AM
Way back in '89 I had a Yamaha FZR 400... that was a sweet bike, and way ahead of it's time! Light weight aluminum frame and a 14,000 rpm red line!

Sold it cause I was way too stupid back then for such a crazy bike.

Silverfire9
01-10-2012, 08:44 PM
Originally posted by Graham_A_M
That bike is a dud in terms of performance, sounds retarded too. I'd grab a Ninja 250 long before I would one of those.


Funny, I've spent the time since I was at the bike show trying to decide between the Ninja 250, Ninja 400 and the CBR250. Based on what I could find, I've eliminated the Ninja 250 because EVERY SINGLE review, shootout, and comparison between the Ninja 250 and CBR250R puts the Honda ahead on nearly every score. The Honda has a better power delivery, more peak power, smoother engine, more comfortable seat, better gas mileage, more stability and a more compliant ride. The only area some reviewers thought the Ninja was farther ahead was that it handled slightly better in a race situation, but let's face it. It's a 250. How many races are you going to win?

My problem now is deciding between the 250 and the 400. I know the 400 would be the better bike for me since I'm a bigger guy, but whether it's worth the $2000 price difference, I don't know. The ABS on the Honda seems like a big advantage while I'm learning too. I have determined that Too Cool is the school to go to, and they have the CBR250RA, so I'm hoping that I can see how it rides toward the end of the course and make my decision on that.

Oh, and props to the zombie master for making a thread that's been dead for 8 years live again. :p

Cooked Rice
01-20-2012, 02:30 PM
The top end power on the CBR sucks balls, it's low compression and low revving single piston banger. 10,500 vs 13,000 on the Ninja. The Ninja is a twin cylinder, high compression, high revving. The Ninja actually has more peak power and is quicker. It's high redline makes it real fun to ride, you can wring it out to redline all day without fear of blowing over speed limits left and right. A Dynojet kit to replace the factory needles and jets adds even more kick to the top end and makes it sing up to 14,000 before the rev limiter kicks in.

The CBR has better fuel economy due to it's EFI, and a couple more lbs of torque down low. You might save a loonie at the pump every time. The Ninja is by far not gutless down low either. The newest generation of Ninja 250 had it's fuel settings revised offer more low-midrange power to make it comfortable for new riders. Once you get the hang of it, swap out the jets and needles as mentioned, and it gives you more top end fun.

Either way. Get a USED 250. Then upgrade later. Don't waste money on a brand new 250 or 400 because you're gonna want to upgrade either way eventually. Unless your goal is just cheap transportation in the summer.

Graham_A_M
01-20-2012, 04:57 PM
^ Thank you, I didn't have time to write it out (busy studying). The Ninja being a twin is a heck of a lot more tunable as well.