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View Full Version : How do you choose your running/training shoes?



bigbadboss101
02-13-2012, 06:24 PM
Do you buy your training shoes based on brand, style, fit, athletes associated with it, or by other criteria?
In general Asics seem to make good runners, NB have runners for wider feet. How about Reebok, Adidas, Nike, Saucony? Do each of the brands have something that they do better? How about Brooks, Mizuno, Under Amour, Merrell? Puma seem to have a narrow fit. May be it was just the one I tried.

boarderfatty
02-14-2012, 12:59 PM
Each shoe company has a sort of "gimick" that makes theirs unique from others. Asics had GEL, Nike had AIR and SHOX, Reebok has DMX systems Saucony had the GRID system etc. Each shoe has benefits and drawbacks as well as other features such as foam that prevents pronation and supernation. Find a shoe that has the features that best fit your needs, there is no such thing as the "ultimate" shoe.

Best bet is to go somewhere like a running room and get properly fitted.

Personally I find the Asics Gel Nimbus is the best running shoe for me. I find that the Gel provides the needed cushioning for my bigger size while being slightly more durable and long lasting than the Nike Air system. Also it has a wider toe box and narrower heel which accomadates my foot shape best. I also find that the shallower arches in there fit my feel better than other shoes. I have a pretty good step, so a decent torsion box in the arch is all I really need for support. I find features like Duomax foam in the Kayano are actually detrimental to my step because ot over corrects my foot for pronation and pushes my foot out making me supernate.

Like I said all have their gimmicks, pros and cons. Be open to any model, try on a million pairs of shoes, and most of all get properly fitted.

02-14-2012, 01:19 PM
Agreed.

Nike Shox is the biggest gimmick ever. Had the worst shin splints with those. The Asic Nimbus are the most comfy running shoes that I have personally worn.

lint
02-14-2012, 01:24 PM
I have wide feet so:
1. Fit
2. Function
3. Fashion

sevewone
02-14-2012, 01:36 PM
Originally posted by boarderfatty
Each shoe company has a sort of "gimick" that makes theirs unique from others. Asics had GEL, Nike had AIR and SHOX, Reebok has DMX systems Saucony had the GRID system etc. Each shoe has benefits and drawbacks as well as other features such as foam that prevents pronation and supernation. Find a shoe that has the features that best fit your needs, there is no such thing as the "ultimate" shoe.


Like I said all have their gimmicks, pros and cons. Be open to any model, try on a million pairs of shoes, and most of all get properly fitted.

This.

In the last few years I have had two pairs of NB's, 1 shitty pair of Adidas Cross training shoes and now I am using 40$ asics lol. I workout very regularly and overall I really have had the best luck with NB's. Only downside is that each pair of NB's I have had has worn out very fast.

The asics I have very good support and are awesome for wide feet (which is pretty much most guys). Another upside is you can find them CHEAP!

Not only would I stay away from Nike Shox, but I would also avoid Under Armour shoes. If you think about it they just came into the market a few years ago, how much research could they possibly have? Not only that but they feel really cheap. And I also find Pumas are just for looks as well, I could never imagine myself really tearing ass in them without thinking they will self destruct lol.

Overall, New Balance or Asics is what I would go with.. Also what are you mostly going to be doing? Strength training or cardio?

boarderfatty
02-14-2012, 02:00 PM
Originally posted by sevewone


This.

In the last few years I have had two pairs of NB's, 1 shitty pair of Adidas Cross training shoes and now I am using 40$ asics lol. I workout very regularly and overall I really have had the best luck with NB's. Only downside is that each pair of NB's I have had has worn out very fast.

The asics I have very good support and are awesome for wide feet (which is pretty much most guys). Another upside is you can find them CHEAP!

Not only would I stay away from Nike Shox, but I would also avoid Under Armour shoes. If you think about it they just came into the market a few years ago, how much research could they possibly have? Not only that but they feel really cheap. And I also find Pumas are just for looks as well, I could never imagine myself really tearing ass in them without thinking they will self destruct lol.

Overall, New Balance or Asics is what I would go with.. Also what are you mostly going to be doing? Strength training or cardio?

I do like a lot of things about New Balance, but they have never worked for me, I like the fact they come in multiple widths, they are also in general super light. My problems with them are the absorb foam doesn't provide enough cushioning for me vs Asics Gel, I am willing to sacrifice a little extra weight for the added cushioning. My other problem is the multiple widths. while it is convenient for most it isnt for me. when you go up from a D width to an EE width the whole shoe gets wider, not just the toe box but the heel as well. I have a little wider toe box, but my heel is average, maybe a little narrow even. So while the toebox of a EE shoe is perfect for me, I swim in the heel, and a D width fits my heel nicely, but am squeezed in the toe box.

There are so many little things when it comes to finding a proper shoe which is why I recommend trying on as many models as possible, and getting properly fitted for a shoe at a running store.

Even if you don't want to pay running shop prices, you will walk away with an education, you will know what you need, what you want, what fits etc. that way when you go on line, or talk to some 16 year old at sport check it wont be a crapshoot of a choice.

Artega
02-14-2012, 02:06 PM
I vouch for Gord's running room if you are looking for running shoes. Their staff are knowledgable and patient. I spend 1.5 hours in the store and he brought out no less than 15 pairs of shoes for me to try on.

Finally decided on a pair purely based on fit and was the best pair of running shoe i've had. 300 km of running and a marathon later, not a single blister or black toe nail.

It's certainly worth it to get your shoe properly fitted by an expert.

bigbadboss101
02-14-2012, 02:25 PM
Artega you mentioned you went for couch potato to marathon? Great for you. I don't run much except when playing team sports but I am going to start. Want to get batter fitness, get a bit leaner, and for general health.

When I went to the Running Room I got a pair of NB 772 for running (I think that is the number). It's a little wider and fits my step. The outside of my heels tend to wear more.

For general sports I have a pair of Adidas and for cross training a pair of NB that is a bit stiff. All these are getting old so I am looking at different set. There's the argument of shoes with lot of cushioning vs minimal protection. I did pick up a pair of Five Finger Bikilas and will start walking and then running with those and see how it feels. Thinking of picking up a pair of Merrell Trail Glove for outdoor trail running and then a pair of ??? for indoor sports. If they don't work well or feel good then I probably stick with the traditional well padded shoes.

austic
02-14-2012, 04:55 PM
I have too many running shoes and trainers.
I have some Kayanos i use for distance runs
Some saucony hurricanes i use for mud runs as they are pretty beat up
Some Reebok realflex for light trail runs and outdoor training
Reebok OLY shoes for lifting
NB Minimus shoes for general training
and a pair of Reebok Crossfit Nano's that I have on order because the rope climbs destroyed my NB minimus shoes

Tomaz
02-14-2012, 05:01 PM
Asics were the best fit for me, and I liked the mesh material for being able to breath. And they were light as hell.

$130 for them, and no complaints.

when I choose:

1) Fit - Big deal for me. I want 100% comfort or I am not buying them

2) Function - I like "mesh" shoes for working out, lightweight, and positive grip (flat soul shoes slide all over the place)

3)Fashion - As long as I don't buy something pink with unicorns, I don't give 2 shits what they look like. I just want them to work. :thumbsup:

eiysa101
02-14-2012, 05:06 PM
shox look wicked though....

sevewone
02-14-2012, 05:18 PM
Originally posted by boarderfatty


I do like a lot of things about New Balance, but they have never worked for me, I like the fact they come in multiple widths, they are also in general super light. My problems with them are the absorb foam doesn't provide enough cushioning for me vs Asics Gel, I am willing to sacrifice a little extra weight for the added cushioning. My other problem is the multiple widths. while it is convenient for most it isnt for me. when you go up from a D width to an EE width the whole shoe gets wider, not just the toe box but the heel as well. I have a little wider toe box, but my heel is average, maybe a little narrow even. So while the toebox of a EE shoe is perfect for me, I swim in the heel, and a D width fits my heel nicely, but am squeezed in the toe box.

There are so many little things when it comes to finding a proper shoe which is why I recommend trying on as many models as possible, and getting properly fitted for a shoe at a running store.

Even if you don't want to pay running shop prices, you will walk away with an education, you will know what you need, what you want, what fits etc. that way when you go on line, or talk to some 16 year old at sport check it wont be a crapshoot of a choice.

I know what you mean my outside toe always seems to get very crushed even on EE. And couldnt agree with you more about the 16 year olds at sport chek, goes in one ear and out the other lol.




Originally posted by Artega
marathon later, not a single blister or black toe nail.


Damn your lucky. No socks?


Originally posted by bigbadboss101


For general sports I have a pair of Adidas and for cross training a pair of NB that is a bit stiff. All these are getting old so I am looking at different set. There's the argument of shoes with lot of cushioning vs minimal protection. I did pick up a pair of Five Finger Bikilas and will start walking and then running with those and see how it feels. Thinking of picking up a pair of Merrell Trail Glove for outdoor trail running and then a pair of ??? for indoor sports. If they don't work well or feel good then I probably stick with the traditional well padded shoes.

The NBs will loosen right up, they are just not broken in yet ;). And the only thing I noticed with less padded shoes all around the foot is more moisture from small puddles and snow would make my socks wet.

CanmoreOrLess
02-14-2012, 06:06 PM
You wouldn't take your vehicle to Canadian Tire or Walmart for repairs, why would you take your body to SportCheck, Footlocker, etc. Head to a running store where they live and die on one thing, running shoes.

Personally NB and Asics fit the best, but that could be due to the expert fitting them. I have had Nike and Adidas (from box stores) in various forms and they end up as casual shoes simply due to how crap they are.

Proper running type socks make a big difference in my use, I like the individual toe type when I can find them.

dirtsniffer
02-14-2012, 07:50 PM
^ I always pictured you for a guy who would wear toe socks.

Personally, I like cross trainers and it doesn't really matter on the type. I've tried a few pairs of runners and while good for jogging I destroy them quick on the squash court.

Khyron
02-14-2012, 10:20 PM
I've gone though at least a dozen pairs. Brand doesn't matter cause they change every year. 1 year I liked the progrid then next year it was crap and after 200km I was done with them. Last year Brooks and Zoot was the best for me. Who knows this year.

Shoe should FIT right away, break-in is a myth. Shoe should feel good, no sliding or rubbing at all. Once you figure if you're sup/neutral/pronator then you can pick your own shoes without help. Buying the wrong kind will spoil your day.

lint
02-14-2012, 10:54 PM
since the OP wasn't mentioning running shoes specifically, going to a speciality running store limits the choices just a bit

boarderfatty
02-14-2012, 11:13 PM
Originally posted by lint
since the OP wasn't mentioning running shoes specifically, going to a speciality running store limits the choices just a bit

Title says running/training shoes. I told him how to get running shoes, same principle applies to every type of shoe. find a store that caters specifically to whatever you need, get expert advice.

msommers
02-15-2012, 08:15 AM
+1 for the Running Room. I had literally no idea what I needed and they got me all setup. It's normal to try on a LOT of shoes and they know that. You have to set some time away when getting into a good pair of shoes.

98type_r
02-15-2012, 09:45 AM
Originally posted by Khyron
I've gone though at least a dozen pairs. Brand doesn't matter cause they change every year. 1 year I liked the progrid then next year it was crap and after 200km I was done with them. Last year Brooks and Zoot was the best for me. Who knows this year.

Shoe should FIT right away, break-in is a myth. Shoe should feel good, no sliding or rubbing at all. Once you figure if you're sup/neutral/pronator then you can pick your own shoes without help. Buying the wrong kind will spoil your day.

Solid advice right here, there is no need or reason to be brand loyal in shoes because they change models so often. Once you get educated even a little bit and get past the gimmicks it's pretty easy to pick the good from the bad. I typically replace my running shoes after ~400km, the tread might not be completely worn down but a lot of the foam/gel has.

KRyn
02-15-2012, 09:51 AM
If you squat or deadlift any serious weight you should be wearing the flatest and thinnest shoes possible (unless you like squat shoes). That's why I always train in Chuck Taylors. When I do anything cardio based these days I wear Asics. I have found them to be the best all around athletic shoe.

bigbadboss101
02-15-2012, 10:03 AM
Good responses guys. The other day I did squats and liked using the flat/thin shoes. I think for general training a good fitting shoe will do and for ball hockey I would get a pair of good court shoe. For outdoor sports proably a good pair of Asics runners.

austic
02-16-2012, 12:14 PM
If you want a flat all around trainer try the NB minimus. Great overall but the soles are not very durable.

sh0ko
02-21-2012, 12:56 PM
vibrams...

importracer1
02-21-2012, 10:29 PM
Originally posted by KRyn
If you squat or deadlift any serious weight you should be wearing the flatest and thinnest shoes possible (unless you like squat shoes). That's why I always train in Chuck Taylors. When I do anything cardio based these days I wear Asics. I have found them to be the best all around athletic shoe.

This.

I train with Nike sneakers, it's not really thin but it gets the job done. Plus I love the looks of it, so thats a nice bonus.

lint
03-16-2012, 08:40 PM
if anyone is looking for the nb minimus, was just at the winners in west hills and saw the runners and trainers. $59!