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Sugarphreak
05-30-2013, 11:59 AM
Anybody have a standby generator for their house?

I was thinking pretty seriously about buying this:

http://www.amazon.com/Generac-CorePower-5837-Air-Cooled-Generator/dp/B003XQWYW0/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1369940212&sr=8-2&keywords=standby+generator+automatic

Comes with a transfer switch, runs on natural gas, kicks in automatically when the power goes out.

ercchry
05-30-2013, 12:05 PM
out east i could see it with how many blackouts they have had when the temp is over 30 degrees... but IN the city out here? not worth it...

ganesh
05-30-2013, 12:07 PM
Originally posted by ercchry
out east i could see it with how many blackouts they have had when the temp is over 30 degrees... but IN the city out here? not worth it...
+1

ExtraSlow
05-30-2013, 12:13 PM
Even places like Airdrie have many more blackouts than we do. I've lived in Calgary now for fifteen years, and had maybe three blackouts that lasted more than thirty seconds.

In a rural area, this would be a great idea.

Sugarphreak
05-30-2013, 12:18 PM
I am more concerned with keeping my sump pump operational during the spring months. If my house was to lose power with the type of rain we have had recently, it would have a flooded basement in a matter of an hour. My basement is undeveloped and it was over 4000$ in damage last time it had just an inch of water in it…. my new house has a way bigger basement that is developed, damage would be in the tens of thousands, easy to justify spending some money on a sump and backup power supply.

I had actually ordered a Duracell 1800 Powersource for about 600$, only to learn it had been discontinued. The next best option is over 1100$... this standby generator on the other hand is maybe 2000$ and unlike a battery backup, it wouldn’t have a time limit for how long it can operate. Plus the added bonus of powering my entire house during blackouts, more than pays for itself if there is some kind of major event that knocks out power for a few days IMO.

ercchry
05-30-2013, 12:20 PM
i would think the installation bill for that fucker would be pretty steep... stop building below the water level... ballers build on hilltops :poosie:

Sugarphreak
05-30-2013, 12:27 PM
Yeah, I am poor… I could only afford the hillside, haha.

Even with installation costs it is still cheap compared to fixing a flooded basement… plus added comfort of having power during ice storms, brownouts, the coming electric car induced blackout of 2015, and of course the zombie apocalypse.

ercchry
05-30-2013, 12:28 PM
psh, maybe if you got had a portable supply of fuel... not hard plumbed into the city's gas supply.

diesel or bust!

Sugarphreak
05-30-2013, 12:29 PM
Originally posted by ercchry
psh, maybe if you got had a portable supply of fuel... not hard plumbed into the city's gas supply.

diesel or bust!

Runs on propane too... just in case

ercchry
05-30-2013, 12:32 PM
i still dont see why your house is flooding due to rain if you are on a hillside though?

flooding due to too much water usage when the pump isnt running... sure... but you can control that

ExtraSlow
05-30-2013, 12:49 PM
Interestingly, the sump pump in my house runs maybe twice a year. It's bone dry down there right now. I think my yard has good drainage.

Sugarphreak
05-30-2013, 01:00 PM
Originally posted by ercchry
i still dont see why your house is flooding due to rain if you are on a hillside though?

flooding due to too much water usage when the pump isnt running... sure... but you can control that

It is hydrostatic pressure in my case, not surface drainage. I am not entirely sure why the water table is so high, both my current house and my new house have geotechnical reports saying they should need a sump pump… yet every house on my block without one has flooded.

I noticed even with this little bit of rain we got last week the sump pump (which they said I didn’t need, but I insisted upon installing) at my new place is running. I was hoping the geotechnical report was correct and it would never run… I bet in a few years when cracks develop in houses around mine they will flood, I should be fine.

codetrap
05-31-2013, 07:13 AM
I don't have a hot standby, but I do have a gen that I can tie into the house line power manually to power a couple of things. I've been thinking about running the numbers to see if it's more cost effective to generate my own power via NG, with NG being so cheap.... it probably wouldn't work, but it's an interesting exercise.

Sugarphreak
05-31-2013, 04:11 PM
Originally posted by codetrap
I don't have a hot standby, but I do have a gen that I can tie into the house line power manually to power a couple of things. I've been thinking about running the numbers to see if it's more cost effective to generate my own power via NG, with NG being so cheap.... it probably wouldn't work, but it's an interesting exercise.

I've thought of this a few times, it isn't so much the cost of electricity as it is the all the fees and riders. Then again once you factor in the cost of a gen set, maintenance, and cost of the NG to supply it I don't think it is economical.