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cidley69
12-06-2020, 11:19 AM
In this hyper-competitive job market, would like any edge possible.

Can anyone recommend a service to boost LinkedIn profile, and make resume/CV get noticed amoungst the sea of applicants?

sexualbanana
12-06-2020, 06:19 PM
I don't know what it's like in your industry, but I wouldn't rely so much on boosting my profile as I would using it in a more active sense like identifying companies you want to work for and finding the people who have similar jobs to the one you want. That's basically how I've managed to find my last couple jobs.

killramos
12-06-2020, 06:22 PM
Make sure it’s complete, accurate, and targeted towards the roles you want and I wouldn’t put any more effort into LinkedIn than that.

Also no shitty profile photos.

The_Rural_Juror
12-06-2020, 08:29 PM
Only slutty photos. Honestly.

ExtraSlow
12-06-2020, 08:36 PM
Having worked with professional resume writers multiple times, I do have a comment.

Those services can help, but you still need to do a ton of work yourself or they can't do much. Start with your own work first before you hire anyone.

killramos
12-06-2020, 08:37 PM
Only slutty photos. Honestly.

These don’t hurt

ExtraSlow
12-08-2020, 02:56 PM
In this hyper-competitive job market, would like any edge possible.

Can anyone recommend a service to boost LinkedIn profile, and make resume/CV get noticed amoungst the sea of applicants?

Bro, did you get anywhere with this? I've looked at a lot of resumes from both sides of the desk and I'd give you some suggestions for free. Or follow Carol Bird on Linkedin, she runs a company that does this kind of work, and they do freebies from time to time.

Biggest suggestion is to think about every job or bullet point and try to make sure you are demonstrating the specific action you personally took, not describing the duty that anyone in that role would have been asked to complete. If you can quantify the results in dollars, that's even better.

Mitsu3000gt
12-08-2020, 03:10 PM
I wouldn't bother. Every company is looking for something slightly different, and the people willing to look over your resume probably took a weekend course or something rather than the 20yr HR manager you would want giving you advice. The content is always more important than formatting, etc. assuming it's well done. Try make sure every point on your resume has an action and an outcome, for example "I did X which saved the company X dollars" (not that simple but you get the point). Quantify everything you can to increase credibility. The last thing you want to do is fill it with stuff like "good team player". Most resumes I've seen just regurgitate a job description and that does nothing to show them your value.

Just use a good template, make sure everything looks perfect, is written specifically for the job you're applying for, accurate, etc. and I doubt you would be any further behind the people who paid to have someone look at their resume. The other thing that makes me nervous about those services is if they don't tell you to change anything, they can't demonstrate value, so they might get you to change something that didn't need to be changed in the first place, possibly to your detriment.

ExtraSlow
12-08-2020, 03:32 PM
It's a good point. If you pay two "experts" you will get two answers, and they will always want to make big changes to justify the fee. I always suggest making sure you are happy with your own resume first before you consider paying someone.

Darkane
12-08-2020, 03:37 PM
This might be an old tactic (5-10 years) - but I had tremendous success with a single page resume very specifically targeted to the individual jobs.

A General resume is a bad idea.

Use the cover letter as supplement to the resume with specific projects, jobs and skills.

The random scanning software reads both for buzz phrases.

ExtraSlow
12-08-2020, 04:01 PM
The single-page idea works in some industries/roles, but it's not suitable for everything. I mean, make sure the first page is excellent, but don't be shy about having a second, or third page. Especially if you are submitting to ATS Software. For that shit, longer is better if you can cram in some buzzwords on the back pages.

Mitsu3000gt
12-08-2020, 04:07 PM
Nothing wrong with a multi-page resume as long as quality is consistent throughout and the information is actually relevant. Mine is 2 full pages and I know some executives with resumes as long as 4 pages. If you are on your third page scraping the bottom of the barrel or talking about how you're a "fast learner" and "proficient in MS Office", or your McDonalds job in 2001, then get rid of it haha.

ExtraSlow
12-08-2020, 04:10 PM
If your first page sucks, nobody will read page 2,3,4 or whatever. I had a few good chats with a recruiter once. Her rule of thumb was for "first pass" reading, she would spend 30 seconds per resume, and sort about 20% of them into a pile that was worth reading in more depth. She could do 100 resumes an hour no problem this way. I'm a lot slower. I'm about 2-3 minutes per resume, and I do usually flip to the second page, but then again, I never have to go through more than 20, and I only do that a few times per year. .

killramos
12-08-2020, 04:14 PM
Resume Pass 1 - if you bring up your beer league trophy the resume goes in the trash.

But then again I have never hired a salesman so what do I know

ExtraSlow
12-08-2020, 04:16 PM
Resume Pass 1 - if you bring up your beer league trophy the resume goes in the trash.

But then again I have never hired a salesman so what do I know

You are WAAAAY off bro.

ThePenIsMightier
12-08-2020, 08:28 PM
If your first page sucks, nobody will read page 2,3,4 or whatever. I had a few good chats with a recruiter once. Her rule of thumb was for "first pass" reading, she would spend 30 seconds per resume, and sort about 20% of them into a pile that was worth reading in more depth. She could do 100 resumes an hour no problem this way. I'm a lot slower. I'm about 2-3 minutes per resume, and I do usually flip to the second page, but then again, I never have to go through more than 20, and I only do that a few times per year. .

I'm no hiring goddess, either. But I've got a couple Golden Rules to send you straight to the trash can.
1.) It shall be 4 pages max with a strong preference for 2 pages. Violate this? Trash.
2.) "M.Eng, PMP" is straight into the trash with an ominous LoL that others around me can hear and will ask about.

The first one is most likely pertinent to you, while the second prolly isn't.
If the candidate is old and worked at Union Carbide Bhopal in December of 1984 and is too fucking dumb to shave a couple decades of experience off of the resume, I know everything I need to know.

killramos
12-08-2020, 09:21 PM
2.) "M.Eng, PMP" is straight into the trash with an ominous LoL that others around me can hear and will ask about.
Preach


If the candidate is old and worked at Union Carbide Bhopal in December of 1984 and is too fucking dumb to shave a couple decades of experience off of the resume, I know everything I need to know.

Wow...

ExtraSlow
12-08-2020, 09:41 PM
I really respect good project managers and people who go beyond their bachelors, but the M.Eng PMP does seem to be some kind of weird nexus that cancels out those two potential positives and leaves something quite unpalatable.

ThePenIsMightier
12-08-2020, 10:04 PM
I really respect good project managers and people who go beyond their bachelors, but the M.Eng PMP does seem to be some kind of weird nexus that cancels out those two potential positives and leaves something quite unpalatable.

But only 111% of the time!
It's the most astonishingly accurate metric of concentrated, consolidated shit that's there is. I'll bet everything on it, every time!

- - - Updated - - -


Preach


Wow...

I can literally show you a resume with that.
No joke.

ExtraSlow
12-08-2020, 10:08 PM
cidley69 my comments are in your inbox.

msommers
12-09-2020, 11:23 PM
What is it about M.Eng and PMP that is vomit inducing? I'm actually studying for my PMP now and have considered an M.Eng to try to get into the Geotechnical field, albeit I'm not keen on more schooling if I can help it.

On topic, I wish I had advice for you but networking and who I've known (with pretty average resumes used) is how I've gotten jobs with casual interviews. Lately I've spent a lot of time resume writing, going insane over every little detail, using LinkedIn services, job scan ATS evaluators, and my interview rate has been dismal. That's even with internal referrals. Safe to say its kind of a crap shoot right now.

dirtsniffer
12-09-2020, 11:57 PM
Personally, my company policy is to post external even if there is already an internal lock. No idea why, just to waste time I guess

msommers
12-09-2020, 11:58 PM
Marketing purposes.

tonytiger55
12-10-2020, 12:44 AM
Spend a bit of money and get some decent professional photos with good lighting etc. As a species we are visual.

One of my ex girlfriends was a higher up at a oil and gas company. She helped re-write my resume and honestly she was the only one that did a decent job. I went to all the job/resume writing stuff in the city. Its subjective.

I found LinkedIn did not do much. It was a secondary area where a employer could check to see additional info. As others have mentioned, use LinkedIn to research.

As others have mentioned, network, network and NETWORK. Volunteer, be aware of your passive body language, can you hold a conversation..? I was interviewing a candidate last year and he could not hold a conversation AT ALL. That was a big no no for the job. To be fair I have no idea how you will do this in the current climate. You could try just being part of your community association. These people do have links to other areas. Just turn up for the meeting. Ours are on zoom.

Outside of Linkedin...Pay attention to your presentation (suite, tie, cuffs, what kind of shirt?). Don't wear something because its smart, have a bit of class. Pay attention to your shoes, are they fucking polished? How do you shake someones hand? Is your hand limp? Does the knot in your tie match the collar of your shirt? Sounds a bit extreme, but in a room full of other candidates this makes a difference (especially with the ladies).

Clean all these things up. So it can mask your deficiencies. Do not think for a minute the application process is a fair fight its not. This is what I found gave me a edge and got attention with a lot of senior people.

ThePenIsMightier
12-10-2020, 07:27 AM
What is it about M.Eng and PMP that is vomit inducing? I'm actually studying for my PMP now and have considered an M.Eng to try to get into the Geotechnical field, albeit I'm not keen on more schooling if I can help it...

The combo is a dead giveaway for someone who got their "engineering degree" in Krakozhia or similar and APEGA has said "Yeah, no. You're going to need to retake these __ courses and/or pass the FE Exam because we've found that people with degrees from Krakozhia don't know the difference between concrete and pipe or that F = ma."
So, they try to pass the FE Exam and can't. Multiple times.

The workaround is to get an M.Eng from your friendly, neighbourhood university. I don't directly know, but I've heard that this consists of very little technical content and very Grade-10-level papers. Then, lie your way to a PMP qualification and pass that test so you've got enough letters after your name to get a job at PorleyWarsons or whatever other Walmart Engineering firm.
*I think the M.Eng also satisfies a portion of APEGA where they may treat you like an EIT...

If you want to get into Geotech, I'm guessing you'd look at a M.Sc which is highly technical.

killramos
12-10-2020, 09:51 AM
That and people who keep going back to school for the same thing just screams “I didn’t work out in the workforce”.

Out of 100 positions there are less than a handful I think someone having a master degree in engineering would be an asset for.

Coming from Geoscience it’s not really the same, Master degrees are common and valuable in GeoSc. But for engineering, it really is a certain (re special) kind of person who gets a masters in engineering. It’s a bizarre degree that has next to no value in the real world and is tailored completely for academia and was usually a signal they could never get hired after their bachelors.

I have fewer comments on PMP excerpt that it seems to be a certification in beuracracy.

engibeer
12-10-2020, 09:57 AM
*I think the M.Eng also satisfies a portion of APEGA where they may treat you like an EIT...

If you want to get into Geotech, I'm guessing you'd look at a M.Sc which is highly technical.

You're right, I think APEGA counts a Masters in anything as 1-year of experience toward a P.Eng.

Based on my failure/victory laps around academia, it's generally something like:

MEng = 4-5 courses and a thesis, generally the 'good' prof's won't work with you unless your work is novel enough to be published, although that varies a lot.
MSc/MASc = 8 courses and 2 "project" courses aka. group capstone projects.

dirtsniffer
12-10-2020, 10:00 AM
I know a few M.Eng's in my field. they are neither good scientists or good engineers.

ExtraSlow
12-10-2020, 10:29 AM
It's a bad generalization, but often people who were great at their jobs and experiencing upwards career movement, did so without the credentials. If that wasn't happening, they pursued the credentials. That was true during the busy times anyway. Now, it's a little different, and maybe it does help you stand out. It may not. I don't know.

Still, the best way to get anything is individual networking, volunteering, and making sure people know who you are, what you can do, and that you are actively looking for work. Submitting a higher volume of resumes is a very low percentage game.

Adding any credential is only helpful if it suddenly makes you stand out from the crowd of applicants. How many PMP's are unemployed right now, and how many PMP jobs are there? I'd guess there's more unemployed PMP's than data scientists.

killramos
12-10-2020, 11:41 AM
I disagree with what people say around generalizing BSc BASc BEng and the masters versions, that’s a Calgary phenomenon in my experience based on so many people going to the 2 universities in this province and drawing arbitrary lines.

For the rest of the country the name of your degree is literally just up to the preference of the granting university and has next to nothing to describe the program that was taken. If it’s an accredited engineering degree it’s an accredited engineering degree and I wouldn’t read into it any more than that.

Tl:dr the name of the degree is completely irrelevant. Actually I’ll go even farther and say having a degree is completely irrelevant and it’s near entirely what you do with it. I use nearly none of my formal education in my day to day job, at least from my bachelors degree. But that’s mostly because O&G engineering is a joke.

aarny25
12-21-2020, 04:33 AM
Nothing wrong with a multi-page resume as long as quality is consistent throughout and the information is actually relevant.

But it's always important to check the relevance of any data, when it's all located on one page, in my opinion. Any page should be optimized as well, and it's the process, that should be done in the process of developing site. I know great dev companies, who care about this, like this one ( https://www.talenteria.com/ ) called Talenteria. They do everything they can for building really nice career sites for everyone who needs it.

2Legit2Quit
02-18-2021, 11:13 AM
Going to piggy back off this thread

Looking to create a resume as I'm ready to jump ship after almost a dozen years of working for the same company.

I've essentially spent my professional career under this umbrella of acquisitions over the years, should I just list my title and duties under each company and the time range for the flow of responsibilities as things have changed over the past decade+?

Is there any point of listing any prior jobs before this? It would have been smaller helpdesk positions in my early 20's which is more or less irrelevant for what I do now.

Should I try to keep it to one page? or list project and major accomplishments over the years on a subsequent page?

ExtraSlow
02-18-2021, 11:22 AM
Don't worry about one page. Two or three is fine, but you do need the best stuff on the first page.

There's different ways to format when your company has been acquired. You want to show how your role changed over time in whatever manner is simplest.

And as always, focus on your achievements and your actions that generated results.

ThePenIsMightier
02-18-2021, 11:23 AM
Going to piggy back off this thread

Looking to create a resume as I'm ready to jump ship after almost a dozen years of working for the same company.

I've essentially spent my professional career under this umbrella of acquisitions over the years, should I just list my title and duties under each company and the time range for the flow of responsibilities as things have changed over the past decade+?

Is there any point of listing any prior jobs before this? It would have been smaller helpdesk positions in my early 20's which is more or less irrelevant for what I do now.

Should I try to keep it to one page? or list project and major accomplishments over the years on a subsequent page?

I'd try to keep it to 2 pages. Not >3 in my opinion.

sexualbanana
02-18-2021, 12:31 PM
I'd try to keep it to 2 pages. Not >3 in my opinion.

If your resume is 3 pages long, you better have a damn good reason for it. Like you've been churning out nothing but hits in your career. If it's just describing your job, then you can cut it out and save the space and the reader's time.

ThePenIsMightier
02-18-2021, 12:34 PM
If your resume is 3 pages long, you better have a damn good reason for it. Like you've been churning out nothing but hits in your career. If it's just describing your job, then you can cut it out and save the space and the reader's time.

I agree. I was going to add "unless I already know that you walk on water, I'm tossing your 3+ page resume into the trash with my old Ellen Page Fan magazines".

killramos
02-18-2021, 12:34 PM
2 pages.

Fits on one piece of paper, front and back, expect no one to ever look at the back but it’s there for dumb stuff like your miracle peewee hockey goal you scored when you were 12 and to say something about being competent in PowerPoint and Excel.

Document the rest of the crap on LinkedIn, the hiring manager can find it there if they are even remotely interested.

rx7boi
02-18-2021, 01:10 PM
Add a hyperlink to your LinkedIn on the PDF version of your resume.

2Legit2Quit
02-18-2021, 01:44 PM
I don't have a LinkedIn profile, figured I'd be a lifer so never saw any value in it on account of I hate all forms of social media.

I'll roll without one and see if I have any luck down the road, thanks for the resume tips all.

killramos
02-18-2021, 01:50 PM
I’m as supportive of anyone with skipping social media, but I see LinkedIn less as a social platform as much as a digital resume. Namely, so that something professional shows up if someone Google’s your name to help control the narrative rather than drunk Facebook photos coming up.

Just something to consider.

RT16V
02-18-2021, 01:52 PM
I don't have a LinkedIn profile, figured I'd be a lifer so never saw any value in it on account of I hate all forms of social media.

I'll roll without one and see if I have any luck down the road, thanks for the resume tips all.


Lots of farmers hated tractors a while ago, too. Something to think about as you navigate things......

ExtraSlow
02-18-2021, 02:01 PM
LinkedIn has some value to a job seeker for sure. You need to be intentional with how you use it, and realistic about what you expect out of it too.

JDMMAN
02-20-2021, 10:39 PM
For those interested in taking it to the next level, check out the career transformation/transition programs from Higher Landing.

https://www.higherlanding.com/

ExtraSlow
02-20-2021, 11:10 PM
Anyone interested in a chat about the higher landing programs, PM me. Or dig up my posts on the subject.

austic
02-22-2021, 03:40 PM
I wouldn't hire someone without a LinkedIn. I want to see how they market themselves digitally.

SKR
02-23-2021, 08:52 AM
I wouldn't hire someone without a LinkedIn. I want to see how they market themselves digitally.

I'd hate to work at a place like that.

Not saying that there's anything wrong with wanting or requiring employees to have a Linkedin profile, just that I definitely would not excel at a place with a culture like that.

ExtraSlow
02-23-2021, 08:55 AM
In some industries or roles, it would be a basic level of competence required to perform in the role. In lots, it doesn't matter.

I see the value, it got me one job.

SKR
02-23-2021, 09:11 AM
Yeah I can see how it would be a useful tool for employees and employers both.

For me, my ideal job is one without bosses or customers. The kind of person who desires that is not the kind of person that writes Linkedin profiles.

2Legit2Quit
02-23-2021, 09:23 AM
In my case what would it matter if I created a LinkedIn profile, I'd have zero connections and the work history would be what's listed in my resume anyway.

If not getting a job over a LinkedIn profile while having 10+ years experience and being a leading professional is the case, then I'd just laugh.

I guess you could see some company logos and if I posted any verified certs, woo woo

killramos
02-23-2021, 09:33 AM
If someone sees your name and tries to find your background does your current resume come up on Google?

It’s not difficult to see where it could be helpful for something other than photos of your last trip to Vegas coming up when someone tries to learn more about you. Like it or not there is often to more to applying for jobs these days than an interview and a paper resume.

Plus it’s great for keeping in touch with people who have been laid off. That’s got to be 90% of my LinkedIn messages.

Will not having it automatically disqualify you from a position? Maybe not but pretending it doesn’t exist isn’t exactly putting your best foot forward in many cases. I guess it depends on how unique and special you think you are for a given role in this economy.

ExtraSlow
02-23-2021, 09:46 AM
Like most things the difference it makes is at the margins. But in a crowded job market, I think it's worth the effort for most people.

I certainly wouldn't hire a salesperson who didn't have a profile.

2Legit2Quit
02-23-2021, 09:48 AM
You're making it sound like you're relying on social media to provide background on ones self, people shouldn't be striving to have a large digital footprint unless you want that for some strange reason or are a public figure.

If someone wants to know personal/particulars then they can find that out by asking me instead of typing my name into Google.

Googling my name yields an old phone number from years ago and a public Facebook post someone made a few years ago when I saved a baby cow :rofl:

ThePenIsMightier
02-23-2021, 10:07 AM
You're making it sound like you're relying on social media to provide background on ones self, people shouldn't be striving to have a large digital footprint unless you want that for some strange reason or are a public figure.

If someone wants to know personal/particulars then they can find that out by asking me instead of typing my name into Google.

Googling my name yields an old phone number from years ago and a public Facebook post someone made a few years ago when I saved a baby cow :rofl:

Do you know zero people who have been let go and been attempting to find a job? It's a massacre drowning in a bloodbath.
The people we didn't hire about 6 months ago who were absolutely ideal candidates who would've worked out 99-101% as well as the ones we did hire are still jobless. These are highly qualified professionals with 15+ years of experience in the position to make plenty of money and they can't find squat.
Your LinkedIn profile would "have zero connections" for about 11 minutes. You know people, you click mouse, you get connections and by the end of the day, you have 30+ and add a picture of yourself (not in a budgie smuggler from Tijuana) then boom - you're "intermediate" in profile status.
Choosing to not do this is like cutting off your arm before you try to swim across a river. HR people might need some of the most odious little vermin to walk the earth, but they decide who gets a foot in the door, and they play in the LinkedIn sandbox.

killramos
02-23-2021, 10:20 AM
It’s 2021, if someone can’t figure out an answer to a question they have in a few clicks they move on. You think they will call you? Have you met the millennials who are responsible for cutting down the stack of resumes to the ones that get looked at by someone who is out of diapers?

Anyways. Do what you want. The job market is not the same as it was in 2005.

cjblair
02-23-2021, 11:14 AM
You're making it sound like you're relying on social media to provide background on ones self, people shouldn't be striving to have a large digital footprint unless you want that for some strange reason or are a public figure.

If someone wants to know personal/particulars then they can find that out by asking me instead of typing my name into Google.


If a job has 600 applicants, and 550 get weeded out immediately for one reason or another (assume you are in the 50 that makes it through), you think they're actually going to interview (i.e. call and ask you the questions) the last 50 without doing some low-effort research first? Get real.

To repeat what everyone else has said: it may or may not be mandatory to have a linkedin, but if a person is on the job hunt, why on earth not do literally everything you can to increase your chances of getting an interview? :nut:

fwiw, zero chance I'd hire someone that didn't have a linkedin. I see a lot of resumes, and I can't think of the last time I came across one that didn't have their linkedin URL in the contact info.

ExtraSlow
02-23-2021, 11:25 AM
You're making it sound like you're relying on social media to provide background on ones self, people shouldn't be striving to have a large digital footprint unless you want that for some strange reason or are a public figure.

If someone wants to know personal/particulars then they can find that out by asking me instead of typing my name into Google.

Googling my name yields an old phone number from years ago and a public Facebook post someone made a few years ago when I saved a baby cow :rofl:
You sound very important. I'm happy for you that you apparently have no issue finding and keeping employment.

2Legit2Quit
02-23-2021, 11:42 AM
You sound very important. I'm happy for you that you apparently have no issue finding and keeping employment.

Saving a calf will do that to a person.

It's a different strokes for different folks situation, I'm not looking to or trying to argue with anyone. I get the ease of use of clicking a link, seeing someones picture, work history, etc. But I personally wouldn't, and haven't written someone off because they don't have a LinkedIn profile.

I get if someone is applying for everything under the sun, then yes do all that you can to market yourself and improve your chances. If you're employed and cherry picking possible employment opportunities for a lateral move, then it's a different story.

To each their own with how you go about things.

ExtraSlow
02-23-2021, 11:54 AM
probably industry-specific too. I am a dime a dozen because of my education and experience. I need every trick in the book.

sexualbanana
02-23-2021, 10:37 PM
Saving a calf will do that to a person.

It's a different strokes for different folks situation, I'm not looking to or trying to argue with anyone. I get the ease of use of clicking a link, seeing someones picture, work history, etc. But I personally wouldn't, and haven't written someone off because they don't have a LinkedIn profile.

I get if someone is applying for everything under the sun, then yes do all that you can to market yourself and improve your chances. If you're employed and cherry picking possible employment opportunities for a lateral move, then it's a different story.

To each their own with how you go about things.

It also makes you look like a luddite that refuses to adapt and change with the times. LinkedIn is as much about marketing yourself as it is about job searching. Maybe you do incredible, ground-breaking work. But your work is only as valuable if people know about it. That increases your value and could lead to more lucrative job offers or more lucrative contracts.

Elon Musk is Elon Musk not just for his ability to do really innovative work, but also his extraordinary ability to promote himself.

Mitsu3000gt
03-01-2021, 11:46 PM
I also hate all forms of social media however quite often when you're looking for a job you aren't holding all the cards, so I think it's wise to play along and just make a profile. I think most people who are looking want to do every last thing in their power to find a job and LinkedIn is just one of those things. It's not a huge amount of effort so it's not a big deal IMO, and you never know what might come your way or who you might be able to help. Making a point by not having a profile is fine but it will probably work against you. Obviously it's importance is industry dependent but I think people looking for a 'professional'/office position would be wise to have one. If I got laid off tomorrow I wouldn't have companies lining up to hire me, so I'd be looking for every little thing that might help.

ExtraSlow
03-02-2021, 07:50 AM
If I got laid off tomorrow I wouldn't have companies lining up to hire me, so I'd be looking for every little thing that might help. This is my opinion too. You've got to be a real unicorn these days to not need every advantage.

killramos
03-02-2021, 07:51 AM
This is my opinion too. You've got to be a real unicorn these days to not need every advantage.

You know what they say about unicorns...

ExtraSlow
03-02-2021, 08:03 AM
They are almost as cool as alicorns?
97824

ThePenIsMightier
03-02-2021, 08:04 AM
Magical unicorn mayonnaise?

ExtraSlow
03-02-2021, 01:06 PM
was chatting with a beyond member about resume writing, and how hard it is for older people to understand the way modern resumes need to be written to emphasize ACTION and RESULT.

Here's my best explanation. "imagine at each of your roles, on the day you started, several others also started in the exact same role." Now imagine all those people worked in those roles just as long as you, and they are applying for the same positions as you. If your resume can't explain what you did differently and better than them, they will get the job and not you."

schurchill39
03-02-2021, 09:54 PM
was chatting with a beyond member about resume writing, and how hard it is for older people to understand the way modern resumes need to be written to emphasize ACTION and RESULT.

Here's my best explanation. "imagine at each of your roles, on the day you started, several others also started in the exact same role." Now imagine all those people worked in those roles just as long as you, and they are applying for the same positions as you. If your resume can't explain what you did differently and better than them, they will get the job and not you."

Having specific, measurable examples seems to be becoming more and more important to appear on resumes. I have a friend who was laid off of cenovus and got provided X amount of months of job coaching on Cenovus' dime and thats one of the tips the coach gave him. She said unless you have something that's measurable in dollars, time, or some other key performance metric/indicator then you will likely get passed by for someone who does.

In regards to the Linked In profile I like to think of it as a way to have your all encompassing experience in a generalized resume where as the resume you are actually using to get the job is probably tailored to that specific role or set of keywords. If you use services like jobscan.co or another ATS system to highlight your resume to the job posting you are likely going to have to alter it pretty drastically to "pass" the algorithm filtering you out. With your Linked In profile it can provide more details on you as a complete candidate outside of what the computer system looks for.

Another thing I personally look at pretty frequently is people's activity for posts or things they have liked or posted on. Some people treat it like facebook and post all sorts of conspiracy theories or right wing "fuck trudeau" crap so I use that to weed out my own contacts and anyone I interact with on a professional setting. For example Extra slow likes to keep it Extra Professional and often shares job opportunities or new tech that is relevant to the industry which I appreciate. But there are a pile of Joe Nobody's out there who use it to talk about how covid is a fabrication by the government to take our guns and make our kids gay so they post pictures of their jacked up, clapped out Dodge 1 ton with a trump flag and shit on posts about women in leadership saying "you're only posting this because its a woman and it wouldn't be a big deal if it was a man". I've definitely used it to weed out vendors and sales guys because of shit like that.

ExtraSlow
03-02-2021, 10:01 PM
Another thing I personally look at pretty frequently is people's activity for posts or things they have liked or posted on. Some people treat it like facebook and post all sorts of conspiracy theories or right wing "fuck trudeau" crap so I use that to weed out my own contacts and anyone I interact with on a professional setting. For example Extra slow likes to keep it Extra Professional and often shares job opportunities or new tech that is relevant to the industry which I appreciate. But there are a pile of Joe Nobody's out there who use it to talk about how covid is a fabrication by the government to take our guns and make our kids gay so they post pictures of their jacked up, clapped out Dodge 1 ton with a trump flag and shit on posts about women in leadership saying "you're only posting this because its a woman and it wouldn't be a big deal if it was a man". I've definitely used it to weed out vendors and sales guys because of shit like that.

People's political or conspiracy posts have twice led me to not bother interviewing them.

killramos
03-02-2021, 10:05 PM
Covid has definitely exposed a pretty alarming segment of the population’s inability to keep their shit together as a general statement.

Then again, I can’t say that the kind of people I know on LinkedIn spreading that stuff surprise me.

ExtraSlow
03-02-2021, 10:09 PM
I can have a working relationship with anyone who can present a coherent professional image in professional settings. I don't care what bullshit they believe in thier hearts, I just don't want to hear about it in the workplace, or the interview, or LinkedIn.