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View Full Version : Do you guys take protein on non-workout days?



Gadgetboy
11-20-2004, 04:53 PM
Just curious if its beneficial to take whey protein on your non-workout days, or if you just take it on your workout days.

DefektiveVibe
11-20-2004, 05:14 PM
take it everyday to keep your protein intake up...cuz the mass you gain when not working out can be worked out on your workout days and you should become bigger faster

thats my way of thinking and thats how i do it

three.eighteen.
11-20-2004, 05:42 PM
yeah, you have to in order to keep putting on weight, unfortunately i ran out of money and i hurt my back so i am dropping off the pounds, but im still sorta muscular

davidI
11-20-2004, 05:44 PM
yes you should eat the same on workout days as non-workout days. Your body needs nutrients to repair the muscle fibres and they don't repair IN the gym, they repair while you're away from the gym....

EAT, SLEEP and LIFT HARD :)

cboyspimp
11-20-2004, 06:27 PM
i also do take protien non work out days.. usually fridays and saturdays.. although latley ive been trying to get it from food alone since my mom hasnt bought me new protien lol
check out this site for eating programs and protien/calorie intake
www.johnberardi.com:thumbsup:

badseed
11-21-2004, 09:47 AM
^Hahahaha, mommy can you buy me some protein for my muscles??

awd
11-21-2004, 12:32 PM
I don't, only on days I lift -- careful protein whey will make you fat.

davidI
11-21-2004, 12:57 PM
Originally posted by awd
I don't, only on days I lift -- careful protein whey will make you fat.

:rolleyes:

EnRich
11-21-2004, 01:54 PM
Don't take Protein on your non workout days... Only reason ppl take protein is for meal replacement... If your... Trying to lose weight it counts for one of the six meals during the day... Fact is your body needs protein 15 min after working out, thats the only time you should be taking it... I think that stuff is a waste of money anyway to be honest... And like buddy said above me, protein at too high dosage will make you fat...

awd
11-21-2004, 02:02 PM
Originally posted by davidI
:rolleyes:

Are you confused?

You body can only use so much protein to assist in muscle rebuilding and like EnRich said, the only time I drink a protein shake is within the "golden hour" post workout.

What do you think your body does with all that unused protein? Of course, it stores it as FAT and before you know it you are a whale.

YCB
11-21-2004, 02:08 PM
Originally posted by awd


Are you confused?

You body can only use so much protein to assist in muscle rebuilding and like EnRich said, the only time I drink a protein shake is within the "golden hour" post workout.

What do you think your body does with all that unused protein? Of course, it stores it as FAT and before you know it you are a whale.

:werd: post workout shakes then 45 mins after.. a actual meal.. its better to eat actual food with vitamins, carbs etc.. then a liquid jam packed with protien

but i heard people that take the protien everyday like a couple times aday too.. with very little food.. and they are still living haha

so whatever floats ur boat..

three.eighteen.
11-21-2004, 02:24 PM
Originally posted by awd


Are you confused?

You body can only use so much protein to assist in muscle rebuilding and like EnRich said, the only time I drink a protein shake is within the "golden hour" post workout.

What do you think your body does with all that unused protein? Of course, it stores it as FAT and before you know it you are a whale.

you do realize that if youre really bulking, gaining a bit of body fat is pretty much essential

davidI
11-21-2004, 02:58 PM
I can tell this is a car forum and not a fitness forum. :rolleyes:




Increased Thermic Effect of Feeding While all macronutrients require metabolic processing for digestion, absorption, and storage or oxidation, the thermic effect of protein is roughly double that of carbohydrates and fat. Therefore, eating protein is actually thermogenic and can lead to a higher metabolic rate. This means greater fat loss when dieting and less fat gain during overfeeding.

Increased Glucagon Protein consumption increases plasma concentrations of the hormone glucagon. Glucagon is responsible for antagonizing the effects of insulin in adipose tissue, leading to greater fat mobilization. In addition, glucagon also decreases the amounts and activities of the enzymes responsible for making and storing fat in adipose and liver cells. Again, this leads to greater fat loss during dieting and less fat gain during overfeeding.

Increased IGF-1 Protein and amino-acid supplementation has been shown to increase the IGF-1 response to both exercise and feeding. Since IGF-1 is an anabolic hormone that's related to muscle growth, another advantage associated with consuming more protein is more muscle growth when overfeeding and/or muscle sparing when dieting.

Reduction in Cardiovascular Risk Several studies have shown that increasing the percentage of protein in the diet (from 11% to 23%) while decreasing the percentage of carbohydrate (from 63% to 48%) lowers LDL cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations with concomitant increases in HDL cholesterol concentrations.

Improved Weight-Loss Profile Brand spankin' new research by Layman and colleagues has demonstrated that reducing the carbohydrate ratio from 3.5 - 1 to 1.4 - 1 increases body fat loss, spares muscle mass, reduces triglyceride concentrations, improves satiety, and improves blood glucose management (Layman et al 2003 If you're at all interested in protein intake, you've gotta go read the January and February issues of the Journal of Nutrition. Layman has three interesting articles in the two journals).

Increased Protein Turnover As I've discussed before in my article Precision Nutrition, all tissues of the body, including muscle, go through a regular program of turnover. Since the balance between protein breakdown and protein synthesis governs muscle protein turnover, you need to increase your protein turnover rates in order to best improve your muscle quality. A high protein diet does just this. By increasing both protein synthesis and protein breakdown, a high protein diet helps you get rid of the old muscle more quickly and build up new, more functional muscle to take its place.

Increased Nitrogen Status Earlier I indicated that a positive nitrogen status means that more protein is entering the body than is leaving the body. High protein diets cause a strong positive protein status and when this increased protein availability is coupled with an exercise program that increases the body's anabolic efficiency, the growth process may be accelerated.

Increased Provision of Auxiliary Nutrients Although the benefits mentioned above have related specifically to protein and amino acids, it's important to recognize that we don't just eat protein and amino acids we eat food. Therefore, high protein diets often provide auxiliary nutrients that could enhance performance and/or muscle growth. These nutrients include creatine, branched chain amino acids, conjugated linoleic acids, and/or additional nutrients that are important but remain to be discovered. This illustrates the need to get most of your protein from food, rather than supplements alone.

Looking over this list of benefits, isn't it clear that getting lots of protein would be advantageous to anyone's training goals? Since a high protein diet can lead to a better health profile, an increased metabolism, improved body composition, and an improved training response, why would anyone ever try to limit their protein intake to the bare minimum necessary to stave off malnutrition?


Whether you want to gain muscle or lose weight you're going to want protein in your diet at all times. If you think you only need protein for the hour after you work out then not only have you not done research but you don't have common sense. Do your muscles heal in an hour? Could I train chest, drink a shake and then train chest again 2 hours later? Hell no. I give my muscles a full week to heal and you better believe that they need protein, nutrients and BCAAs. I'm not saying you need to take a shake...I'd actually suggest trying to get your protein from full foods but there's no reason you should increase your consumption on work out days or only post-workout. A lot of pro's actually increase their protein intake on non-workout days and focus more on High GI foods on training days.


Edit: Article from T-Mag...lost the link but I'm sure a copy and paste in google will bring up the source.

awd
11-21-2004, 03:17 PM
I didn't say, "Only have protein after a workout." -- I meant people overdo protein shakes when they are getting more than enough protein from actual food -- tuna, eggs, chicken, etc.

And like I said, if you overeat protein that your body can't use it will be stored as fat.

Chim
11-21-2004, 03:50 PM
There's nothing wrong with protein shakes on non-workout days. Whey protein is used by your body almost immediately, so it's really good in the morning to stop catabolism. Whey isnt the greatest any other time of the day, except post-workout.

I understand what you're saying though, awd. Some people take ridiculous amounts of protein, like 300g for a 150lbs person, and some of that goes to waste if not acting detrimental to muscle growth.

Proper bulking is about eating moderate protein, and above maintenance calories (40/40/20 or 50/30/20 carbs/protein/fat ratio are good nutrient ratios for growth).

There's lots of opinions out there, check out http://www.bodybuilding.com and learn properly.

davidI
11-21-2004, 04:20 PM
From everything I've read 1.5g-2.0g / lb. of bodyweight is pretty much standard for most bodybuilders. There are tons of articles on all sides of the argument but I'm sticking to ~300g / day if I can get it! I personally don't have any whey right now but I would much rather have too much protein than too little. When you look at the BV of most whole food proteins you consume you're probably not getting benefit out of a lot of it unless you're managing to get all your BCAA's. Whey and Eggs are great since their BV is ~100% but most other foods people consume for BB are down in the 60-70 range. In layman's terms, just cause the can says 12g / serving doesn't mean your body is using that 12g...

I agree with Chim that whey is great in the morning to stop catabolism although eggs will do the same thing :)

hockeybronx
11-21-2004, 04:34 PM
Hey Playa...

It is the days that you aren't working out when your body has a chance to start recovering and healing the torn muscle mass.

My view is that you should eat the same every single day.

Fitness isn't a day-on day-off lifestyle, it's an everyday committment.

~Leah~
11-21-2004, 07:27 PM
I eat the same every day, work out or not. On days when I do work out, I MAKE SURE 100% that I eat protein an hour-hour and a half pre-workout, and drink a protein shake within an hour post workout.

I don't really think about what I eat just because I'm sort of in routine now to eat certain foods (nothing crappy in my diet). I just pay a little more attention as to when I eat on my work out days.

TrevorK
11-22-2004, 09:54 AM
Originally posted by awd
I didn't say, "Only have protein after a workout." -- I meant people overdo protein shakes when they are getting more than enough protein from actual food -- tuna, eggs, chicken, etc.

And like I said, if you overeat protein that your body can't use it will be stored as fat.

Absolutely correct - if you are getting the right protein from actual food you don't need a shake.

However, most people have a tough time getting 150-200g of protein from actual food...

hockeybronx
11-22-2004, 03:31 PM
Originally posted by TrevorK


Absolutely correct - if you are getting the right protein from actual food you don't need a shake.

However, most people have a tough time getting 150-200g of protein from actual food...

Hey Playa...

Yeah that is correct on most days, but today is monday, I aint gotta work, I aint gotta go to school. I aint got shit to do other than go out and eat some chicken wings!

JeremyD
11-22-2004, 06:13 PM
I can't imagine how many wings you would need to hit 200g of protein.

badseed
11-22-2004, 06:31 PM
Originally posted by Chim
There's nothing wrong with protein shakes on non-workout days. Whey protein is used by your body almost immediately, so it's really good in the morning to stop catabolism. Whey isnt the greatest any other time of the day, except post-workout.

I understand what you're saying though, awd. Some people take ridiculous amounts of protein, like 300g for a 150lbs person, and some of that goes to waste if not acting detrimental to muscle growth.

Proper bulking is about eating moderate protein, and above maintenance calories (40/40/20 or 50/30/20 carbs/protein/fat ratio are good nutrient ratios for growth).

There's lots of opinions out there, check out http://www.bodybuilding.com and learn properly.

I agree with you, proper ratios must be adhered to. If a 160 pound person is consuming 300g/day then technacially you should eat 700+ carbs a day??? Good luck not exceeding your daily recommended caloric intake. Proper balance is important!!

And as far as eating 300g of protein a day goes, this would be for someone who is serious about bodybuilding on a regimented routine and dietary plan. I would'nt be telling everybody on this forum to consume 300g protein day cuz any serious bodybuilder isn't gonna be consulting a car forum for dietary advice.

And it is better to get your protein from actual food sources.

EG STyLeZ
11-22-2004, 06:55 PM
i don't take whey protein on days where i'm not working out. reason is because whey is a "fast" protein, which is supposed to be taken directly after a workout. there's really no reason to take whey on non-workout days. generally, i just eat more of other proteins on non-workout days.

hockeybronx
11-23-2004, 04:28 PM
Originally posted by JeremyD
I can't imagine how many wings you would need to hit 200g of protein.

Hey Playa...

Well I decided to look it up on my nutritional calculator. I went with Little Ceasars Wings because they don't have Kilkenny's or Limericks on there.

Little Ceasars Wings (1 wing)
Carbohydrate: 0.00g
Fat: 4.00g
Protein: 4.00g

Multiply that by my weekly 30 wings:
0.00 grams of carbs
120 grams of Fat
120 grams of Protein.

It's a good thing I only go once per week.:nut:

awd
11-23-2004, 05:00 PM
Well, the day I replied to this thread I created a spreadsheet for calculating my daily intake of: protein, fat, sugar, carbs.

F*ck, I don't think I am eating enough protein -- for example, yesterday (non-workout day) I only consumed about 90 grams of protein.

I am 5'10" and weigh about 180lbs -- should I really be eating 150+ grams of protein if I want to gain good mass and I am working out 3 times a week?

arrgh.

Mckenzie
11-23-2004, 05:48 PM
Originally posted by awd
Well, the day I replied to this thread I created a spreadsheet for calculating my daily intake of: protein, fat, sugar, carbs.

F*ck, I don't think I am eating enough protein -- for example, yesterday (non-workout day) I only consumed about 90 grams of protein.

I am 5'10" and weigh about 180lbs -- should I really be eating 150+ grams of protein if I want to gain good mass and I am working out 3 times a week?

arrgh.

Yes. I worked out for years without monitoring my diet with minimal results. I actually started paying attention to it this year and I have been seeing great results. 150g + is not that much. One shake in the morning, one after your workout, a can of tuna, a steak or chicken breast and some yogurt or milk will do it for you, depending on how you mix your shakes.

awd
11-23-2004, 05:51 PM
Originally posted by Mckenzie


Yes. I worked out for years without monitoring my diet with minimal results. I actually started paying attention to it this year and I have been seeing great results. 150g + is not that much. One shake in the morning, one after your workout, a can of tuna, a steak or chicken breast and some yogurt or milk will do it for you, depending on how you mix your shakes.

Ok, f*ck it -- time to crank up the protein, worse case scenario I pack on a little fat.

thanks.

Mckenzie
11-23-2004, 06:04 PM
Originally posted by awd


Ok, f*ck it -- time to crank up the protein, worse case scenario I pack on a little fat.

thanks.

No prob....I would not be too worried about packing on the fat. Lifting weights burns just as many calories as cardio does...however usually weight lifters put on extra weight because they eat more. Usually people bulk up by building muscle and then lean out, switching their diet and program over.

davidI
11-23-2004, 06:12 PM
Originally posted by Mckenzie

Usually people bulk up by building muscle and then lean out, switching their diet and program over.

It's the winter so unless you're going somewhere nice for christmas I'd bulk and bulk and bulk until june and then start preparing for summer and the ladies!

cboyspimp
11-23-2004, 06:26 PM
Originally posted by davidI


It's the winter so unless you're going somewhere nice for christmas I'd bulk and bulk and bulk until june and then start preparing for summer and the ladies!
pffff im always ready for the ladies playa i got the bulk where it couts:bigpimp:

cboyspimp
11-23-2004, 06:28 PM
Counts*

awd
11-23-2004, 06:44 PM
I have had the same gf for years -- so I have no one to impress :D

I will report back in two weeks with gains.

Mckenzie
11-23-2004, 06:45 PM
Originally posted by davidI


It's the winter so unless you're going somewhere nice for christmas I'd bulk and bulk and bulk until june and then start preparing for summer and the ladies!

:werd:

And dont forget the 10 lbs you gain between Xmas and new years.....(turkeymuscle, christmasbakingmuscle and molsonmuscle dont count):angel:

Chim
11-23-2004, 06:54 PM
Originally posted by awd

Well, the day I replied to this thread I created a spreadsheet for calculating my daily intake of: protein, fat, sugar, carbs.

F*ck, I don't think I am eating enough protein -- for example, yesterday (non-workout day) I only consumed about 90 grams of protein.

I am 5'10" and weigh about 180lbs -- should I really be eating 150+ grams of protein if I want to gain good mass and I am working out 3 times a week?

arrgh.

The general rule of thumb is 1g - 1.5g protein for each pound of bodyweight. From your posts you seem to be against a high protein intake, and I think even .8g protein should be enough for good gains.

Take a look at my bulking diet if you need ideas: http://forums.beyond.ca/showthread.php?s=&threadid=65135 2nd post down.

Excluding meal #5 and meal #8, the tuna in #7, and post workout shake this comes to:
2533 calories
88g fat
309g carbs
152g protein

This is basically the "constants" of my diet, because I eat these things everyday no matter what. Throw in lunch, dinner, a can of tuna, and post workout shake, and I'm easily at 3500 calories and 200g protein.

Something like this diet should give you some decent gains. Even though you have 10lbs on me I have the fastest metabolism this world has ever seen, so the numbers should be around the same. Hope that helps :)