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View Full Version : The Truth about FAST FOODS



gggunit
01-24-2005, 05:03 PM
I found this site and thought Id share it.. its pretty cool

Check out the Burger King Double Whopper W/ Cheese it has
1150 Calores!!!!
76 GRAMS OF FAT
64 PROTEIN
53 CARBS

http://bodybuilding.com/fun/fastfood.htm#5 :eek:

1badPT
01-24-2005, 05:08 PM
Double Quarter Pounder w/ Cheese at McDonald's is actually decent for bulking. (almost 50 grams of protein!)

awd
01-24-2005, 05:09 PM
So the secret that fast food is bad for you has been uncovered? Amazing stuff man.

Shaolin
01-24-2005, 05:09 PM
was talkin to a friend at school whose girlfriend is a Kines major.. apparently she's got a book where it shows all the nutrition facts of all the fast food joints and BK blew every other joint out of the water.. lucky I don't eat there at all.

gggunit
01-24-2005, 05:10 PM
Originally posted by 1badPT
Double Quarter Pounder w/ Cheese at McDonald's is actually decent for bulking. (almost 50 grams of protein!)


But it has 48G of fat.. prob transfat too

gggunit
01-24-2005, 05:12 PM
Originally posted by awd
So the secret that fast food is bad for you has been uncovered? Amazing stuff man.

It doesnt actually say its bad for you.. everything to the extreme is bad for you.. like in supersize me.. he did it to the extreme.. everything has its limit..

Dave P
01-24-2005, 05:12 PM
The truth is, its delicious hahah

nismodrifter
01-24-2005, 05:15 PM
BK Chicken Sandwhich pwnz me and I don't give a shit....

1badPT
01-24-2005, 05:23 PM
out of the 48 grams of fat, 21 grams of saturated fat (bad fat but not trans fat) but hardly any of that will be transfat - transfats can be found in the fries (the fries are fried in shortening which is made from hydrogenated vegetable oil).'

Transfats are mostly found in oils that have been hydrogenated so they form a hard fat at room temperature (like shortening).

90Tegra
01-24-2005, 05:53 PM
this is such a funny thread after seein "super size me" today

1badPT
01-24-2005, 06:11 PM
I saw supersize me as well. You certainly wouldn't want to make fast food a major part of your diet, but it is a nice treat every so often and its a nice way for bulkers to get extra calories as long as you watch which items you eat.

Fries are generally not a wise choice as they'll most certainly contain transfats. Most of the sauces contain transfats/saturated fats so you can eliminate saucy burgers as wise choices (mc chicken, big mac, and so on).

Out of the drinks here are the rankings of lowest carbs to highest:
water/milk/ice tea/coke/any other softdrink (including frutopia)
the carbs in the drinks above are refined sugar (except for milk of course)

So basically fries and saucy burgers are a no no, and depending on your stance of empty calories, you can probably eliminate the coke/soft drinks as well.

90Tegra
01-24-2005, 06:16 PM
i was a fan of mc nuggets but after seeing how nuggets are made disgusts me

1badPT
01-24-2005, 06:32 PM
Pretty much anything deep fried is not going to be good for you, regardless of what it is but that is especially true for restaurants that deep fry in shortening (which is almost all of them).

gggunit
01-24-2005, 06:46 PM
^ thats why Kentucy Fried Chicken changed there name to KFC so the word "fried" wouldnt be used much.. I heard after they changed it..there sales went up too:dunno:

Khyron
01-25-2005, 09:46 AM
According to weight watchers, the nuggets are better than most of the burgers/fries for weight loss. Nuggets/Fish/Chickens are cooked in a totally different oil than the fries. I mean it's all bad, but 6 nuggets is like 5 points, I think a large fries or a Big Mac is 14 just for comparison. They are even better than a lot of the creamy salads.

Double 1/4 pound no cheese only ketchup. :drool:

Khyron

abyss
01-25-2005, 10:41 AM
Originally posted by Khyron
According to weight watchers, the nuggets are better than most of the burgers/fries for weight loss. Nuggets/Fish/Chickens are cooked in a totally different oil than the fries. I mean it's all bad, but 6 nuggets is like 5 points, I think a large fries or a Big Mac is 14 just for comparison. They are even better than a lot of the creamy salads.

Double 1/4 pound no cheese only ketchup. :drool:

Khyron

I used to love the mcnuggets, but then I was looking at them one day and realized there are only 3 shapes total.....they are so processed that it's not even big chicken pieces anymore :eek:

1) the "boot"
2) the diamond/oval
3) the round

I mean seriously, isn't that MORE than a little disturbing?!

BTW....the boot is my favorite.... :drool:

1badPT
01-25-2005, 11:39 AM
Actually pretty much all fast food chicken is processed and formed like nuggets (mc chicken, the classic chicken at KFC, practically all restaurants nuggets, and so on) with the exception of some sandwiches which use the whole breast. If processed chicken turns you off but you need your fried chicken fix, most restaurants have chicken strips available which are strips of chicken breast.

It was never a surprise to me that chicken nuggets are processed - have a bite of chicken breast and have a bite of a nugget - the texture is completely different. That's not to say a nugget is bad for being processed - think of a nugget as a mini chicken patty that has been breaded. Whats bad is the fact that its fried, and even worse is that its fried in shortening(hydrogenated oil).

And Kyron, weight watchers system is based on caloric count, they don't really factor in types of fats etc. From a calorie count perspective, nuggets really aren't bad, but when you consider the amount of trans fats in them, they become less of a good choice.

Khyron
01-25-2005, 11:52 AM
Originally posted by 1badPT
And Kyron, weight watchers system is based on caloric count, they don't really factor in types of fats etc. From a calorie count perspective, nuggets really aren't bad, but when you consider the amount of trans fats in them, they become less of a good choice.

Not that I'm arguing that it's not healthy, but the points are done with a slider based on calories and total grams of fat. So something that's 500 calories and 1g fat would be the same points as something thats 200 calories with 10g fat (I made those examples up). True some fats are worse than others but until food makers have to label all the fats separately what can you do?

Ideally the best is a salad with light or no dressing. But many people don't realise that a chicken salad with blue cheese dressing is more points than a 6 pack of nugs.

Khyron

ninjak84
01-25-2005, 12:20 PM
After sitting through years of kinesiology and nutrition classes, I can tell you that this thread can go on forever.
For anyone that got sucked into watching "Supersize Me", I feel sorry for you.
But I don't get how that movie can turn anyone off of fast food. Everyone eats a piece of candy, or gum, once in a while right? Well if you ate candy and gum 3 times a day, everyday for a month, I don't think that would turn out good. If someone made a movie doing that, would you then stop eating candy and gum?

All that guy proved was moderation.
I think everyone learns that the first time they get drunk :D


Originally posted by Khyron
True some fats are worse than others but until food makers have to label all the fats separately what can you do?

Have a seat, and wait. :) At the end of this year, manufacturers will have 5 years to comply with new labelling standards in Canada. These include labelling all types of fatty chains in the product, even ones that stem from procedures like inter-esterification instead of hydrogenation.

Khyron
01-25-2005, 12:31 PM
Originally posted by ninjak84

Have a seat, and wait. :) At the end of this year, manufacturers will have 5 years to comply with new labelling standards in Canada. These include labelling all types of fatty chains in the product, even ones that stem from procedures like inter-esterification instead of hydrogenation.

That's great for you bio guys, but for techs like me? I want a GOOD column and a BAD column. :D I suspect food companies will turn it into another ingredients label with so many bizzare names you won't know what's what.

BTW if you want to see a good counter-movie to Supersize, check out "Bowling for Morgan". It's 30 mins on-line - I really liked it.

EDIT: Link: http://www.bowlingformorgan.com/

Khyron

little_wan
01-25-2005, 01:10 PM
Originally posted by Shaolin
was talkin to a friend at school whose girlfriend is a Kines major.. apparently she's got a book where it shows all the nutrition facts of all the fast food joints and BK blew every other joint out of the water.. lucky I don't eat there at all.

I have that book too (also being in kines). You should check out the calories for eggs.

gggunit
01-25-2005, 01:57 PM
Originally posted by little_wan


I have that book too (also being in kines). You should check out the calories for eggs.


how many calories per egg?

little_wan
01-25-2005, 02:18 PM
Originally posted by gggunit



how many calories per egg?

75-100 depending on how you cook it. So think of an average breakfast...2-3 eggs plus something fatty like bacon.

1 egg has about 211mg of cholesterol, so its more the cholesterol that's the problem, not the calories (my bad)

BUT at the same time, eggs are your most complete source of protein, and the egg white isn't that bad

Gondi Stylez
01-25-2005, 11:20 PM
Weel, friend food isn't as bad as most if you guys make it out to be. I agree with fried food being from a fast food joint is friend in hydrogenated fats etc. and that is not too healthy.

BUT @ home...

frying foods and the right tempturature is key to not letting the food absorb all that much fat. a good frying temp is 350-375`C and this will allow for the perfect medium in which to fry. also use canola oil to fry or veg. oil that hasnt been hydrogenated. olive oil is not good for frying as it has a very low smoke point

well, like anything in life moderation is the key and i eat friend foods like that but nothing beats last nights dinner! fried chicken and fries! btw. cooking at home is always healtier then outside, no matter how u cook it!

1badPT
01-26-2005, 12:17 AM
^^very true and frying at home is much healthier than at a restaurant because you'll typically fry in oil instead of shortening. Canola is a wonder oil if you must fry because it contains nutrients, the fats are mostly unsaturated, high smoke point, Canadian crop and last but not least its cheap. :thumbsup:

Jeevin
01-26-2005, 12:34 AM
Originally posted by 1badPT
^^very true and frying at home is much healthier than at a restaurant because you'll typically fry in oil instead of shortening. Canola is a wonder oil if you must fry because it contains nutrients, the fats are mostly unsaturated, high smoke point, Canadian crop and last but not least its cheap. :thumbsup:

No, wrong. The only oil that is fairly resistant to hydogentation is coconut oil. Throughout this thread you have said that fast food restaurants fry in shortening: wrong. Restaurants use vegetable oils (unsaturated fats = liquid at room temperature). Unsaturated fat lipids are good for you, except at raised tempeartures they cause the oils to become hydrogenated, thus gaining sat/trans fats.

You claim the 1/4 pounder with cheese is a good 'protein' burger for bodybuilders!? Ridiculous. Why would any intelligent body builder want 50+ grams of fat, 50+ mg of cholesterol, 20+ grams of saturated fats. What an unhealthy choice. How about 2 chicken breasts/turkey breasts?

Get your facts straight

1badPT
01-26-2005, 12:38 AM
Ok, next time you're in a McDonald's, ask them to show you the BOX that their fryer oil comes in. How can they put oil in a box? They hyrdogenate it to make shortening. My facts are straight buddy, do some research yourself before you jump on my back. That takes care of your whole first paragraph.

Second - if you're bulking, its all about caloric intake and protein intake. The double quarter is high in both and although it does contain some saturated fat, its relatively low compared to other fast food choices.

Got any other gems of wisdom to share?

BloodBaneZXY
01-26-2005, 12:53 AM
There's some burger from Harvey's that looked really good, it was the Grilled chicken something or other. 28g of protein and only 4-5 g of fat, aside from high sodium levels and some other bs that's a pretty fuckin good bulking burger. Someone check this on calorieking.com because I'm way too lazy :P

1badPT
01-26-2005, 01:03 AM
I do have to post that McDonald's HAS actually changed from shortening - so on that fact, Jeevin is correct. In fact, its fairly recently that they changed from shortening to oil.

Wendy's and Burger King to my knowledge still use shortening but I'll confirm it tomorrow and update my post.

Your mention of coconut oil still doesn't make sense. Hydrogenation is a chemical process where oil is heated and then high pressure hydrogen gas is added. Heat alone will NOT hydrogenate an oil. Heat by itself can create transfats however. How much is created depends on the oil.

Coconut oil IS resistant to the formation of transfats when heated, but it contains a lot of saturated fats naturally, so I still don't see why you mentioned it...

Mckenzie
01-26-2005, 09:42 AM
So how do places like subway compare then?

I know they have nutritional info as well, but you wonder if anyting they serve there is healthy for you....it is all so processed looking and packaged. I mean the chicken, the meats, etc taste ok but you know that stuff is not real, and at that you wonder how healthy it is.:dunno:

1badPT
01-26-2005, 11:34 AM
Subway has the advantage of offering a lot of fresh vegetables but the meats and cheese are processed. To its detriment, however, the toppings are all optional so its hard to get figures on nutrition from them.

This is the US Subway website:
http://www.subway.com/applications/NutritionInfo/nutritionlist.aspx?CountryCode=USA&ID=sandwich

They are assuming that you aren't really putting anything on the sandwich. As long as you make healthy choices with your toppings you have the potential to beat other fast food offerings. You still have to be choosy though - look at how many grams of fat are in the tuna sandwich :eek: and thats a six inch! Before anyone says that the fats in tuna are good - I agree, however most of the fat in that sandwich comes from the mayonaise they mix into the tuna to make it tuna salad.

Also its hard to tell whether their meats have been deep fried prior to delivery to the restaurants. Until companies are required to display trans fats seperately, thats a bit of a question mark for Subway. Some restaurants lump transfats into their saturated fat figures (McDonalds) while others list it seperately (Burger King) and still other don't list it at all (that would be Subway).

Jeevin
01-26-2005, 04:58 PM
Originally posted by 1badPT
Ok, next time you're in a McDonald's, ask them to show you the BOX that their fryer oil comes in. How can they put oil in a box?

First of all, this is incorrect. As an employee at Safeway, I know that oil does infact come in boxes. What else would you ship vegetable oil in, barrels? No. Inside that wonderful box that has graced your ignorant eyes there is a plastic container that contains the vegetable oil. (Usually big containers that have about 8L of vegetable oil in them)

Any fast-food restaurant or snack-food producer committed to consistency in flavor and color can benefit from oil that lasts a long time. The less often they have to change the oil, the less money they have to spend. So industry and fast-food chains process their oils with a technique called hydrogenization. By inserting hydrogen into a liquid oil's chemical structure, they make the grease partially solid and more stable. Unfortunately, partially hydrogenated oils break down into "trans fats," nuggets of nutritional nightmares that may raise cholesterol levels and increase risk for heart disease.

McDonald's uses a mix of oils. Here is a quote from their website

"A blend of partially hydrogenated fat and oil (beef fat and cottonseed oil), " ( I know, you did say I was right)

Also, about bulking up with double quarter pounders, most people with common sense would realize that there are far healthier sources of protien than a Double Quarter Pounder with Cheese. It contains 115% of your reccomended daily intake for Saturated fats/trans fats 115%!! In one burger!!, 150 mg of cholesterol, and 1300mg of Sodium! How can you say it has " a little bit " of saturated fats.

PS - don't be a personal trainer or your patients may have heart attacks in the gym. Also with so much Sodium, your muscles will lose water, and you will lose muscle recovery speed .(stress/recovery)

Don't believe me?

http://pic18.picturetrail.com/VOL867/3161380/6439575/82799805.jpg

Ridiculous!


Also, about cocunut oils, I just wanted to say that there was a good alternative to cooking with. Because yes, it does reduce trans fats, ( my bad, I did not intend to say Hydrogenation). Cooking in any oil is unhealthy.) However raw oils are great for you as they contain essentail fatty acids, and lipids that are very healthy. Flax seed oil and Olive oil are healthy alternatives.

ALSO, coconut Oil DOES NOT naturally contain a lot of saturated fats as any saturated fats are SOLID at room temperature :rolleyes:


EDIT: LOL Im stilling laughing about putting oil in a box

-How do they put juice in a box?
-How do ship milk in a box?
:clap:

1badPT
01-26-2005, 05:18 PM
LOL I'm not saying Double Quarters are the best source for protein, I'm saying its decent for bulking. Sure there are better sources, but if you are going to eat fast food, Double Quarters are good for lots of calories and protein. When I bulk, I put on dirty bulk and clean it up later when I cut. Other people will do whatever they feel will work for them. Further, I never said the Double Quarter doesn't have a lot of Saturated fat, if you're going to quote me, do it right, otherwise you'll be the one seen as having ignorant eyes ;)

Your point about Sodium is backwards too. Sodium causes the tissues to retain water, what dries out is your blood (under normal circumstances). Since your body will take up more water, that water come from the bloodstream. If you're bulking (or doing pretty much any bodybuilding activity) you'll be taking in higher than average water anways - so the sodium isn't a concern here. For average individuals it would be.

For bodybuilders, retained water in the tissues is a good thing - it means faster recovery for muscles and potentially more reps at the gym.

Flax and Olive oil are no good for deep frying, they both smoke (and eventually burn) at low temperatures.

PS - And just to clarify the box thing, the last time I ate deep fried fast food was several years ago when McDonalds was indeed still using shortening. When you said they use oil, I looked it up and realized they had changed, and I'm not above admitting when I'm wrong. You on the other hand are still arguing a point that I've already agreed with you on, so it makes me wonder what the point of your post is...

1badPT
01-26-2005, 05:24 PM
OMG you edited again - Coconut oil does so contain saturated fat - open a can of coconut milk and tell me what that hard fat is at the top of the can is...

There are people who beleive that the saturated fats in coconut oil are indeed healthy, but there is no grey area as to whether or not coconut oil is naturally saturated, because it is.

gggunit
01-26-2005, 05:29 PM
im going for the double wopper today.. had to miss a meal due to work.. and will help me get over the hump..1150 Calores!!!!
with a baked patato and Ice Tea

allright.. had my burger with a baked patato, side or mozza sticks and ice T, and im still hungry..

good burger :thumbsup:

ninjak84
01-27-2005, 02:10 AM
Originally posted by Khyron
BTW if you want to see a good counter-movie to Supersize, check out "Bowling for Morgan". It's 30 mins on-line - I really liked it.

EDIT: Link: http://www.bowlingformorgan.com/

Khyron

Thanks for the link, I just watched it today.
Good show, I liked it too! LOT'S of good parts in it. He was really good at leaving his bias out of the movie. That's the problem I have with so many documentaries, is that they're way too bias towards one thought or idea.

badseed
01-29-2005, 05:49 PM
Another site that pretty much shows the index of all foods not just fast food.

http://caloriesperhour.com/index_food.html

RiceCube
02-01-2005, 05:58 PM
YUMMY! wow im soo hungry now