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Thread: Idle No More protests target bridges, roads across Canada

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    Default Idle No More protests target bridges, roads across Canada

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/story/...-saturday.html

    The Idle No More protest movement continues to gain steam with more demonstrations Saturday, after Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced he would meet with a delegation of First Nations chiefs, including Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence, who is now on day 26 of a hunger strike.

    A number of groups have pledged to block bridges, several of which straddle the Canada-U.S. border.

    Police in Cornwall, Ont., closed the International Bridge for more than three hours in response to an Idle No More protest that began mid-Saturday morning. About 350 protesters crossed the bridge.The bridge reopened by 2 p.m. local time.

    And in Saskatchewan, RCMP say they've close off Highway 624 from Highway 1 to Highway 46 for safety precautions due to a protest of about 300 people.

    Meanwhile, the Idle No More protest that was blocking commercial trains on Canadian National Rail tracks between Moncton and Miramichi, N.B. on Friday has been shut down. CN Rail filed a temporary court injunction Friday afternoon.

    Organizers with Idle No More have organized several other demonstrations on Saturday at sites including:

    The Peace Arch crossing in Surrey, B.C., from 1 to 2 p.m. PT.

    NWT's Deh Cho Bridge between 2 and 4 p.m. MT.

    The Canadian side of the Blue Water Bridge in Sarnia, Ont., for one hour. Sarnia police said the bridge would be closed in both directions from noon until 1 p.m.

    The Peace Bridge between Fort Erie and Buffalo in the Niagara region, starting at 1 p.m. ET. Organizers say it will be "peaceful," and they will occupy only one lane of traffic on the international bridge.

    A disruption is also planned at the Queenston/Lewiston Bridge between Niagara Falls and Niagara on the Lake.

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    What if we setup "IDLE SOME MORE" protests in front of the Gray Eagle Casino ?

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    Ezra Levant: "She's allegedly coming up to the one month mark, far longer than Mahatma Ghandi could do a hunger strike, and she's still as tubby as when she started!"


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    *waits until this turns into another typical Beyond native discussion*

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    What is it about? Not idling your vehicle for more then 10 mins?

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    ...
    Last edited by Sugarphreak; 07-12-2019 at 11:41 AM.

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    i didnt read the article, cuz i dont really give a shit. But I doubt one can not eat anything for 26 days straight??? Is she like some super native woman?

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    Originally posted by Team_Mclaren
    i didnt read the article, cuz i dont really give a shit. But I doubt one can not eat anything for 26 days straight??? Is she like some super native woman?

    Article states shes been surviving on fish broth and tea.
    Originally posted by GTS Jeff
    You know those bored stay at home moms who's entire lives revolve around driving their kids to soccer, various cleaning accessories, and worrying about neighbourhood rapists? The kind of people that watch the View and go "uh huh..." Those unfulfilled people who try to fill the void in their empty lives by writing whiny letters to the editor complaining about shit that no one really cares about?

    Well imagine if instead of writing that letter to the editor, she just posts on a car forum for car enthusiasts. That's Kritafo.

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    ...
    Last edited by Sugarphreak; 07-12-2019 at 11:41 AM.

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    Originally posted by dj_rice
    Article states shes been surviving on fish broth and tea.
    AKA a diet. If that's a "hunger strike", I'm a fucking Cowboy Astronaut Millionaire.
    Originally posted by SJW
    Once again another useless post by JRSCOOLDUDE.
    Originally posted by snowcat
    Don't let the e-thugs and faggots get to you when they quote your posts and write stupid shit.

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    you could live on fish broth, hebal teas and such for months with few ill effects. Hell throw in a multi-vitamin and you could probably go a year.

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    All I know is, I'm getting sick of these protests. I was at West Edmonton Mall when they did theirs. Get the f outta the way, I just want to do my shopping and go.
    Originally posted by GTS Jeff
    You know those bored stay at home moms who's entire lives revolve around driving their kids to soccer, various cleaning accessories, and worrying about neighbourhood rapists? The kind of people that watch the View and go "uh huh..." Those unfulfilled people who try to fill the void in their empty lives by writing whiny letters to the editor complaining about shit that no one really cares about?

    Well imagine if instead of writing that letter to the editor, she just posts on a car forum for car enthusiasts. That's Kritafo.

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    Isnt this about harper wanting to finally abolish the 100 year old treaty crap that the natives have been clinging to rather than getting the fuck over it and moving on. Bill c-45 or something like that.

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    From what I understand (very little), Harper changed a law that lowered the minimum band support needed to give up their reserve lands and also they're upset about changes that reduce the number of protected water ways.

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    The waterway thing I'm really not sure about. It SEEMS dangerous, but is it really?
    Originally posted by SJW
    Once again another useless post by JRSCOOLDUDE.
    Originally posted by snowcat
    Don't let the e-thugs and faggots get to you when they quote your posts and write stupid shit.

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    What is it they're protesting?

    *googles*

    Edit: K so long story short, Bill C-45 simply makes it easier for first nations to lease land?
    I missed the part about waterways, my loose understanding is it removes or vastly shortens the approval process of building on navigational waterways? Is that correct?

    So if my understanding is correct, it simply makes it easier for natives to lease land if they want too. It's not FORCING them to do anything, just if they choose to lease land to, say a casino, then they can do it with a simple majority rules vote and not having to wait close to a year for the Governor Generals signature. Where the fuck is the issue there? Nobody would be FORCING them to lease land, and they could still revoke the lease later if they wanted.

    The bitch it all is, there is no good solution to the native 'problem'. I don't mean to say that natives are a problem, but being born onto a reserve is getting born into a vicious circle and dependency on welfare. Harsh as it is, they should have simply treated them as any conquered people at the time and the generations now might be better off, by todays standards at least. Too late now. Don't wanna come across as a native basher, I believe they're the victims of those treaties and there isn't any fix or change to it now that isn't going to piss off a lot of people
    Last edited by btimbit; 01-05-2013 at 08:26 PM.

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    Idle No More protests choose the wrong targets


    BY MARK MILKE, VANCOUVER SUN JANUARY 5, 2013



    STORYPHOTOS ( 1 )



    Idle No More protesters demonstrate in Oakville, Ont. Friday, where Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced he will meet with First Nations delegates next Friday.
    Photograph by: Matthew Sherwood, The Canadian Press , Vancouver Sun
    In the wake of the Idle No More protests that have blocked railway lines and have hinted at more mischief, multiple grievances have been advanced in place of clear-headed analyses. But none of the slogans, clichés and guilt-tripping get to the bottom of why some aboriginals, especially on reserves, are in a sorry state.

    First, some misinformation about one supposed reason for the protests, that reserves will be broken up by Bill C-45, should be debunked.

    That recent federal legislation allows First Nations to lease some of their land to others if they so choose.

    In British Columbia, the Westbank and Osoyoos First Nations have prospered using such lease arrangements to create housing subdivisions and commercial complexes. The money flows back to the reserves' owners.

    All Bill C-45 would do is to allow even more reserves to imitate those successful models. But the bill does not mandate that path and nor does it allow for reserve land to be sold (as has been incorrectly claimed).

    Another mistaken assertion is that taxpayers have not done enough for Canada's native peoples.

    Let's be clear about the benefits some First Nations and Inuit peoples receive that other Canadians do not.

    To use one example, every Canadian has access to universal and taxpayer-funded health care through their provincial ministry of health.

    However, Health Canada runs the Non-Insured Health Benefits Program, which gives additional health care benefits to First Nations and Inuit peoples.

    Health Canada notes that 846,024 First Nation and Inuit peoples have access to "medically necessary drugs, dental care, vision care, medical supplies and equipment, short-term crisis intervention mental health counselling and medical transportation." The cost of dental treatment, eyeglasses, ambulatory services and everything else on that list is not cheap: In 2010/11, the bill to taxpayers was just over $1 billion.

    That amounts to a $1,200 health care benefit per eligible enrollee, this while the other 34 million Canadians must buy insurance for such services and goods or pay out of pocket.

    In the federal department of Aboriginal and Northern Affairs, the main ministry for aboriginal spending, $115 billion will have been spent on services and programs for aboriginals between 1994-95 and this year, according to that department and the Public Accounts. That figure excludes other federal departments and provincial government spending.

    This year, 84 per cent of that department's money will go directly to aboriginals, band governments or programs for aboriginals. (The remaining 16 per cent is chewed up in departmental operating costs.) One could argue more money should be spent.

    But that would ignore the broken governance structure on too many reserves. Such structures already allow some chiefs, such as hunger striker/ Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence and her colleagues, to earn salaries far above that earned by other politicians in similar-sized hamlets.

    For example, in the remote Ontario township of Algonquin Highlands (halfway between Toronto and North Bay) with 2,100 people, the entire council was paid just $119,220 in 2011.

    In Attawapiskat, with 1,500 people, the total bill for political salaries in 2011 was $607,364. Moreover, all of that came tax-free to Spence and her band colleagues.

    Ironically, that tax-free status is courtesy of Section 87 of the Indian Act, the act that is routinely (but quite properly) derided for interfering in the lives of Canada's "Indian" and Inuit peoples.

    Double-standards aside, Idle protesters miss a critical reason why so many reserves are in poor shape: They are in the middle of nowhere and cannot be sustained by the local economy because there isn't one.

    It is impossible to bring the opportunities available in urban Canada to rural Canada. Even in non-reserve villages, educational, health and career options are severely limited. That's why the only people who live in such remote areas are those who already have money, or have the skills to work in nearby mines, mills, or in other industries (where they exist). Otherwise, poverty is guaranteed.

    Additionally problematic for reserves is the lack of proper governance. In non-native towns and cities, most money flows up from local taxpayers via property taxes. That creates a natural taxpayer-politician link and accountability.

    On reserves, taxpayer money mostly flows down from Ottawa into reserve coffers. That creates a demand for more cash from faraway taxpayers, or from the nearby resource company, rather than answers from reserve politicians about existing money flows.

    Just as tragic, that structure allows band politicians to spend money on unreasonable political salaries and on housing for friends, family and political allies, first, with everyone else put in the queue.

    Such fundamental problems with how reserves are run - and the unsustainable nature of some of those rural collectives - is what protesters should ponder. That would be more useful than making up grievances about private companies and taxpayers.

    Mark Milke is a senior fellow at the Fraser Institute and author of several studies on Aboriginal issues.



    Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Idl...#ixzz2H9sl0U5u

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    So the main issue they're protesting...is one that doesn't even exist? I've spent the last 20 minutes scanning the internet and it seems that most people that support 'idle no more' seem to think that the bill will break up reserves?
    Fuck people are stupid.

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    Originally posted by rob the knob
    Idle No More protests choose the wrong targets


    BY MARK MILKE, VANCOUVER SUN JANUARY 5, 2013



    STORYPHOTOS ( 1 )



    Idle No More protesters demonstrate in Oakville, Ont. Friday, where Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced he will meet with First Nations delegates next Friday.
    Photograph by: Matthew Sherwood, The Canadian Press , Vancouver Sun
    In the wake of the Idle No More protests that have blocked railway lines and have hinted at more mischief, multiple grievances have been advanced in place of clear-headed analyses. But none of the slogans, clichés and guilt-tripping get to the bottom of why some aboriginals, especially on reserves, are in a sorry state.

    First, some misinformation about one supposed reason for the protests, that reserves will be broken up by Bill C-45, should be debunked.

    That recent federal legislation allows First Nations to lease some of their land to others if they so choose.

    In British Columbia, the Westbank and Osoyoos First Nations have prospered using such lease arrangements to create housing subdivisions and commercial complexes. The money flows back to the reserves' owners.

    All Bill C-45 would do is to allow even more reserves to imitate those successful models. But the bill does not mandate that path and nor does it allow for reserve land to be sold (as has been incorrectly claimed).

    Another mistaken assertion is that taxpayers have not done enough for Canada's native peoples.

    Let's be clear about the benefits some First Nations and Inuit peoples receive that other Canadians do not.

    To use one example, every Canadian has access to universal and taxpayer-funded health care through their provincial ministry of health.

    However, Health Canada runs the Non-Insured Health Benefits Program, which gives additional health care benefits to First Nations and Inuit peoples.

    Health Canada notes that 846,024 First Nation and Inuit peoples have access to "medically necessary drugs, dental care, vision care, medical supplies and equipment, short-term crisis intervention mental health counselling and medical transportation." The cost of dental treatment, eyeglasses, ambulatory services and everything else on that list is not cheap: In 2010/11, the bill to taxpayers was just over $1 billion.

    That amounts to a $1,200 health care benefit per eligible enrollee, this while the other 34 million Canadians must buy insurance for such services and goods or pay out of pocket.

    In the federal department of Aboriginal and Northern Affairs, the main ministry for aboriginal spending, $115 billion will have been spent on services and programs for aboriginals between 1994-95 and this year, according to that department and the Public Accounts. That figure excludes other federal departments and provincial government spending.

    This year, 84 per cent of that department's money will go directly to aboriginals, band governments or programs for aboriginals. (The remaining 16 per cent is chewed up in departmental operating costs.) One could argue more money should be spent.

    But that would ignore the broken governance structure on too many reserves. Such structures already allow some chiefs, such as hunger striker/ Attawapiskat Chief Theresa Spence and her colleagues, to earn salaries far above that earned by other politicians in similar-sized hamlets.

    For example, in the remote Ontario township of Algonquin Highlands (halfway between Toronto and North Bay) with 2,100 people, the entire council was paid just $119,220 in 2011.

    In Attawapiskat, with 1,500 people, the total bill for political salaries in 2011 was $607,364. Moreover, all of that came tax-free to Spence and her band colleagues.

    Ironically, that tax-free status is courtesy of Section 87 of the Indian Act, the act that is routinely (but quite properly) derided for interfering in the lives of Canada's "Indian" and Inuit peoples.

    Double-standards aside, Idle protesters miss a critical reason why so many reserves are in poor shape: They are in the middle of nowhere and cannot be sustained by the local economy because there isn't one.

    It is impossible to bring the opportunities available in urban Canada to rural Canada. Even in non-reserve villages, educational, health and career options are severely limited. That's why the only people who live in such remote areas are those who already have money, or have the skills to work in nearby mines, mills, or in other industries (where they exist). Otherwise, poverty is guaranteed.

    Additionally problematic for reserves is the lack of proper governance. In non-native towns and cities, most money flows up from local taxpayers via property taxes. That creates a natural taxpayer-politician link and accountability.

    On reserves, taxpayer money mostly flows down from Ottawa into reserve coffers. That creates a demand for more cash from faraway taxpayers, or from the nearby resource company, rather than answers from reserve politicians about existing money flows.

    Just as tragic, that structure allows band politicians to spend money on unreasonable political salaries and on housing for friends, family and political allies, first, with everyone else put in the queue.

    Such fundamental problems with how reserves are run - and the unsustainable nature of some of those rural collectives - is what protesters should ponder. That would be more useful than making up grievances about private companies and taxpayers.

    Mark Milke is a senior fellow at the Fraser Institute and author of several studies on Aboriginal issues.



    Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/news/Idl...#ixzz2H9sl0U5u
    but ..but..but..we want more.

    I'm typing this from my bow and arrow, but I just cut myself. Can I use your archaic health care?
    Last edited by Seth1968; 01-05-2013 at 09:02 PM.

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    Originally posted by btimbit
    What is it they're protesting?

    *googles*

    Edit: K so long story short, Bill C-45 simply makes it easier for first nations to lease land?
    I missed the part about waterways, my loose understanding is it removes or vastly shortens the approval process of building on navigational waterways? Is that correct?

    So if my understanding is correct, it simply makes it easier for natives to lease land if they want too. It's not FORCING them to do anything, just if they choose to lease land to, say a casino, then they can do it with a simple majority rules vote and not having to wait close to a year for the Governor Generals signature. Where the fuck is the issue there? Nobody would be FORCING them to lease land, and they could still revoke the lease later if they wanted.
    Funniest part is they ASKED for less red tape for leasing their land out

    They're basically protesting because they got what they wanted

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