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Thread: My Acreage Project - Let the fun begin

  1. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by JfuckinC View Post
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    i wonder if the burst pump is more of an issue of cold air coming back into it from the outside?
    Maybe?

    I would be terrified of having all those lines just a few feet under my house, haha.

    I guess you could install a thermostat at the same level to monitor temperatures.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 89coupe View Post
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    Maybe?

    I would be terrified of having all those lines just a few feet under my house, haha.

    I guess you could install a thermostat at the same level to monitor temperatures.
    Where do you think the plumbing for the bathroom, bar, kitchen, etc in your basement goes?

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    Quote Originally Posted by cjblair View Post
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    Where do you think the plumbing for the bathroom, bar, kitchen, etc in your basement goes?
    i think his thought process is that's lower than this would be below grade.

    Think about a walk out though 89coupe, or older homes 4 level split homes with the 1st basement not as deep. it's definitely not an issue.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JfuckinC View Post
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    i think his thought process is that's lower than this would be below grade.

    Think about a walk out though 89coupe, or older homes 4 level split homes with the 1st basement not as deep. it's definitely not an issue.

    Good point.

    OP, can you post some pics of the main lines running up to the house?

    Curious what they look like. I’m assuming the main line is below 8’ running up to the house?

    How are you running your hot and cold lines?
    Last edited by 89coupe; 10-05-2022 at 03:13 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 89coupe View Post
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    Interesting, reason I ask is I know of a lot of homes that have experienced burst sump pumps caused by freezing over a cold winter snap.

    Also plumbers never like to run lines on exterior walls, regardless of how much insulation you add.
    It's actually against code to run water lines in exterior walls nowadays. If you have no choice, you have to basically build a secondary wall. Way I have seen it done is having a wall cavity insulated and drywalled, and then another wall built right up against it on the "interior" for all the piping ect.

    I don't pretend to know how all of this works, but all slab on grade homes have piping in the dirt below the house, often not at much depth at all, so my guess is this is all good. Keep in mind that all of this will get inspected, so it should all be pretty solid and verified by people who know what they are doing (I hope ).

    Here is an idea of most installations I have seen:


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    Quote Originally Posted by 89coupe View Post
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    Good point.

    OP, can you post some pics of the main lines running up to the house?

    Curious what they look like. I’m assuming the main line is below 8’ running up to the house?

    How are you running your hot and cold lines?
    Ha, didn't realize there was another page of replies when I posted the previous reply.

    I think I answered this question in my previous reply earlier in the day, but my main water line is 10' deep as it runs from the well to the house. Unfortunately I didn't take any pics at that time, as I only saw a very deep pit, and by the time I saw it again the line was already run and backfilled. I had contractors do this part and I wasn't there to document.


    This is the only pic I got after it was back filled:



    and this is the pipe as it sticks out into the future mechanical room:



    Hot and cold lines will be ran mostly in the attic. Since the attic is a conditioned space (discussed a few pages back), it's basically a warm zone and thus can run all my utilities up there without risk of freezing. My HVAC piping will be up there as well. I will have a few water lines ran in the concrete for kitchen island for example, but that's about it.

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    So, you're still going to have to throw sand or gravel in there and then pour a concrete slab, correct? And it looks like the mono-foamed together chunks of styrofoam are going to essentially be the concrete forms?
    I guess there also won't be rebar as basement floors don't usually have that.
    This will certainly keep the plumbing safe from freezing, but it seems weird and that's probably only because I've never seen a house built this way. I worry that your concrete will be extra susceptible to cracking but I bet it actually won't because your house probably isn't going to settle a nanometer because it's on so many piles and if your house isn't settling and the slab is resting horizontally against styrofoam then you might never get cracks.
    It's pretty neat!


    Edit: since you just posted while I did.
    That looks to me like your main inlet runs through a sleeve that has heat trace cable in it! That's extra extra freeze protection.
    Last edited by ThePenIsMightier; 10-05-2022 at 11:08 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ThePenIsMightier View Post
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    So, you're still going to have to throw sand or gravel in there and then pour a concrete slab, correct? And it looks like the mono-foamed together chunks of styrofoam are going to essentially be the concrete forms?
    I guess there also won't be rebar as basement floors don't usually have that.
    This will certainly keep the plumbing safe from freezing, but it seems weird and that's probably only because I've never seen a house built this way. I worry that your concrete will be extra susceptible to cracking but I bet it actually won't because your house probably isn't going to settle a nanometer because it's on so many piles and if your house isn't settling and the slab is resting horizontally against styrofoam then you might never get cracks.
    It's pretty neat!


    Edit: since you just posted while I did.
    That looks to me like your main inlet runs through a sleeve that has heat trace cable in it! That's extra extra freeze protection.
    Yah, after the plumbing is done, I still have to run a ton of electrical conduit under here for everything under the sun. This old picture I made gives you an idea of the electrical conduit layout under the slab. It's an older planning picture I made before I knew where the water line or electrical line was going to come in, but generally speaking everything else is correct. At each of those locations where the conduits are to penetrate the exterior of the house are berried 4" PVC sleeves, which I have to dig up on either side of the wall and run my electrical conduits through.

    Name:  Conduits.png
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    Sorry that's more than you were asking, but I figure I add for completion. Anyways, after all those things are done, as well as the garage drains, I will backfill every hole, then 6" of recycled concrete as the base, followed by 2" of spray foam, followed by wire mesh + 4" of concrete. The Styrofoam will indeed make up the forms, but by the time the concrete comes only about 2" of the styrofoam will be exposed due to the various layers of everything else that goes in between.

    Some people do pour completely without rebar/wire mesh, I have seen it done, but I would much rather make it as strong as possible. The pad will be on a heavily compacted clay base, followed by compacted crushed concrete, so it should be pretty solid. Indeed the load on the floor will be the floor itself, and the weight of internal walls/people/appliances/furniture, the house itself won't put any weight on it as it's all on screw piles. It essentially just floats between the walls. My plan is to wire mesh the entire place before the pour (it also makes a great platform to attach hydronic piping to), and in the garage area throw rebar as well, as cars will be the heaviest single item that will have any load on the concrete itself.

    Regarding the main line, unfortunately that is not a heat cable, it's just the power cables for the well pump + an extra electrical plug at the pump location in the yard. I plan on also running a conduit to the well location for ethernet, so I can get an outdoor WiFi antenna mounted out there for better coverage while in the yard

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    Ah, I see. I wasn't fully convinced that was heating cable.

    Mesh is a great idea in the basement. Rebar is a code requirement for garage floor, anyway. 16" on centre if I recall, correctly. Kick it up a notch and go 12" if you wanna be fancy. (Certainly not needed).

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    A couple extra screw piles lined latitude south facing, for four or six solar panels might be a thing after its finished. Wiring up a hole for it in the future would be be a for sure for me. DC solar cabling has to be extra thick, its not like house wiring.
    Defund NASA.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ZenOps View Post
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    A couple extra screw piles lined latitude south facing, for four or six solar panels might be a thing after its finished. Wiring up a hole for it in the future would be be a for sure for me. DC solar cabling has to be extra thick, its not like house wiring.
    Almost everyone I encounter mentions solar panels. We are definitely interested in getting them in the future to line the entire 70+ feet of the roof which gets direct sun all afternoon.

    I was even thinking of getting some of this system setup right from the start....but not CSA approved yet. I was hoping to at least get the transfer switch wired in so I don't have to retrofit after.



    This entire system is pretty neat. Have modular battery units that are charged by solar through the inverter. Automatic transfer switch deals with switching from grid to battery power, and controls the Load Management unit which ensures that your high drain loads are turned off (using existing panel, it's like a proxy device that wiring runs throught). If there is no sun or batteries running low and you have no grid power, you can power on the DC generator (much more efficient) and charge the batteries this way. It's a super cool and very expensive system, but seems awesome. Basically have whole power backup that never runs out unless you lost gas for the generator. Can also have it switch to battery power overnight for the whole house to not consume grid power, and recharge during the day off solar. One day.

    This is how they list it in their marketing:

    Day: Home runs on solar, charges the battery, and sells extra power to the grid
    Night: Home runs on battery power, energy use is optimized
    During a Power Outage: Run your home on battery, recharge daily with solar, top-off the battery with PWRgenerator when needed



    This is the roof section that will be kept clear of most penetrations for future panels. It's like 76 feet long overall and guessing like ~25 feet tall, so lots of real estate.

    Last edited by eblend; Yesterday at 12:05 PM.

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